Development of a nocturnal behavior taxonomy of older adults diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/277946
Title:
Development of a nocturnal behavior taxonomy of older adults diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease
Author:
Wyles, Christina Lee, 1959-
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The concept being studied was nocturnal behaviors of persons diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. Maslow's theory of human motivation and development served as the conceptual perspective for this exploratory study. The purposes of this study were: (1) to identify nocturnal behaviors of persons diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease; and (2) to develop a taxonomy that characterized these identified nocturnal behaviors. Eleven caregivers who were each providing care in the home for a family member with Alzheimer's disease were interviewed. Data were systematically obtained using demographic data sheets, guided interview questions, and a behavior checklist. The classification of two major and five minor categories along with their 22 activity categories comprised the taxonomy of nocturnal behaviors. Presentation of the findings included a narrative description of the analysis of data. Through comparative analysis, a variety of nocturnal behaviors were identified and supported.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Gerontology.; Health Sciences, Nursing.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Crosby, Leanna

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleDevelopment of a nocturnal behavior taxonomy of older adults diagnosed with Alzheimer's diseaseen_US
dc.creatorWyles, Christina Lee, 1959-en_US
dc.contributor.authorWyles, Christina Lee, 1959-en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe concept being studied was nocturnal behaviors of persons diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. Maslow's theory of human motivation and development served as the conceptual perspective for this exploratory study. The purposes of this study were: (1) to identify nocturnal behaviors of persons diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease; and (2) to develop a taxonomy that characterized these identified nocturnal behaviors. Eleven caregivers who were each providing care in the home for a family member with Alzheimer's disease were interviewed. Data were systematically obtained using demographic data sheets, guided interview questions, and a behavior checklist. The classification of two major and five minor categories along with their 22 activity categories comprised the taxonomy of nocturnal behaviors. Presentation of the findings included a narrative description of the analysis of data. Through comparative analysis, a variety of nocturnal behaviors were identified and supported.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectGerontology.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nursing.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorCrosby, Leannaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1345421en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b27028926en_US
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