Domestic water considerations within large irrigation and resettlement projects: A case study in Sri Lanka

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/277897
Title:
Domestic water considerations within large irrigation and resettlement projects: A case study in Sri Lanka
Author:
Myers, Abigail Ann, 1957-
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Domestic water supply, utilization and management were characterized within the Mahaweli Development Scheme in Sri Lanka. Domestic water in a Mahaweli-developed village was compared to that in an ancient village. Domestic water supply and quality were linked to irrigation supply and local hydrogeology. Taste, flow and accessibility determined water utilization. Hydrogeology in the ancient village provided a better domestic water situation. Agency-provided wells often went unused in the new village because of poor quality and unavailability of groundwater. Surface-water sources were likewise less reliable in the new village. Consequences of poor siting included increased workloads and health risks for domestic water users. Domestic water considerations that must be incorporated in irrigation/resettlement planning are presented. Simple hydrologic investigations utilization of local knowledge and participation can assist planners and managers to provide villagers with safe and acceptable domestic water.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Cultural.; Hydrology.; Women's Studies.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Maddock, Thomas, III

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleDomestic water considerations within large irrigation and resettlement projects: A case study in Sri Lankaen_US
dc.creatorMyers, Abigail Ann, 1957-en_US
dc.contributor.authorMyers, Abigail Ann, 1957-en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractDomestic water supply, utilization and management were characterized within the Mahaweli Development Scheme in Sri Lanka. Domestic water in a Mahaweli-developed village was compared to that in an ancient village. Domestic water supply and quality were linked to irrigation supply and local hydrogeology. Taste, flow and accessibility determined water utilization. Hydrogeology in the ancient village provided a better domestic water situation. Agency-provided wells often went unused in the new village because of poor quality and unavailability of groundwater. Surface-water sources were likewise less reliable in the new village. Consequences of poor siting included increased workloads and health risks for domestic water users. Domestic water considerations that must be incorporated in irrigation/resettlement planning are presented. Simple hydrologic investigations utilization of local knowledge and participation can assist planners and managers to provide villagers with safe and acceptable domestic water.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Cultural.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology.en_US
dc.subjectWomen's Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMaddock, Thomas, IIIen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1343850en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b26874465en_US
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