Binghampton Rural Historic District, a study of an urban neighborhood's attempt to gain historic district status

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/277896
Title:
Binghampton Rural Historic District, a study of an urban neighborhood's attempt to gain historic district status
Author:
Mann, Christine Toler, 1946-
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The River Bend neighborhood should be preserved as Binghampton Rural Historic District because it is a vestige of the Mormon colony of Binghampton and because it preserves part of the farming history of the Tucson basin. It reflects the pattern of both Mormon agrarian colonization and western settlement. Reminders of the original Mormon farmers exist in the form of fence lines, tree lined roads, orchards, and irrigation ditches. Unpaved, straight streets are aligned with the cardinal directions. The clustering of buildings in a comparatively large open space is characteristic of the spatial arrangement of rural Mormon landscapes. A survey of residents indicates a majority support the petition to become a historic district, but rezoning is a political process which will require the neighborhood to use a multi-faceted approach to achieve protection.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
History, United States.; Architecture.; Urban and Regional Planning.
Degree Name:
M.L.Arch.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Zube, Ervin H.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleBinghampton Rural Historic District, a study of an urban neighborhood's attempt to gain historic district statusen_US
dc.creatorMann, Christine Toler, 1946-en_US
dc.contributor.authorMann, Christine Toler, 1946-en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe River Bend neighborhood should be preserved as Binghampton Rural Historic District because it is a vestige of the Mormon colony of Binghampton and because it preserves part of the farming history of the Tucson basin. It reflects the pattern of both Mormon agrarian colonization and western settlement. Reminders of the original Mormon farmers exist in the form of fence lines, tree lined roads, orchards, and irrigation ditches. Unpaved, straight streets are aligned with the cardinal directions. The clustering of buildings in a comparatively large open space is characteristic of the spatial arrangement of rural Mormon landscapes. A survey of residents indicates a majority support the petition to become a historic district, but rezoning is a political process which will require the neighborhood to use a multi-faceted approach to achieve protection.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHistory, United States.en_US
dc.subjectArchitecture.en_US
dc.subjectUrban and Regional Planning.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.L.Arch.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorZube, Ervin H.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1343849en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b26874453en_US
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