The effect of dietary copper deficiency on plasma lipoprotein profiles in male and female hamsters

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/277885
Title:
The effect of dietary copper deficiency on plasma lipoprotein profiles in male and female hamsters
Author:
Surina, Denise Marie, 1963-
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Studies were conducted to determine the conditions in which alterations in cholesterol and lipoprotein metabolism can be induced by copper deficiency in male and female hamsters. Three week old animals were placed on either a copper-deficient or copper-adequate diet. The hematocrit and hepatic copper content were significantly reduced in the treatment animals, and the plasma volume was enlarged. These changes, however, were small in comparison to the findings of previous studies using copper-deficient rats. The hamsters, therefore, appeared to be only marginally deficient. There was no treatment effect on the composition of the lipoprotein fractions, except for decreases in HDL protein concentration and pool size in the plasma of females fed the copper-deficient diet. It was concluded that the copper status of the treatment animals was not sufficiently diminished to affect lipoprotein profiles and plasma cholesterol, and that dietary treatment should begin earlier than the third week of age.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Agriculture, Animal Culture and Nutrition.; Health Sciences, Nutrition.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Lei, K. Y.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe effect of dietary copper deficiency on plasma lipoprotein profiles in male and female hamstersen_US
dc.creatorSurina, Denise Marie, 1963-en_US
dc.contributor.authorSurina, Denise Marie, 1963-en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractStudies were conducted to determine the conditions in which alterations in cholesterol and lipoprotein metabolism can be induced by copper deficiency in male and female hamsters. Three week old animals were placed on either a copper-deficient or copper-adequate diet. The hematocrit and hepatic copper content were significantly reduced in the treatment animals, and the plasma volume was enlarged. These changes, however, were small in comparison to the findings of previous studies using copper-deficient rats. The hamsters, therefore, appeared to be only marginally deficient. There was no treatment effect on the composition of the lipoprotein fractions, except for decreases in HDL protein concentration and pool size in the plasma of females fed the copper-deficient diet. It was concluded that the copper status of the treatment animals was not sufficiently diminished to affect lipoprotein profiles and plasma cholesterol, and that dietary treatment should begin earlier than the third week of age.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Animal Culture and Nutrition.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nutrition.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLei, K. Y.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1343830en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b26882619en_US
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