The relationship between intrinsic and extrinsic factors and central venous catheter infections in the acutely ill patient

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/277870
Title:
The relationship between intrinsic and extrinsic factors and central venous catheter infections in the acutely ill patient
Author:
Edwards, Helen Frances, 1957-
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to describe the relationship between intrinsic and extrinsic factors and central venous catheter infections in acutely ill patients. Intrinsic factors (inherent) included sex, age, diagnoses, surgical procedures, and medical history. Extrinsic factors (external) included central venous catheter variables and other invasive medical devices. Nosocomial central venous catheter infections were categorized as catheter related bacteremias and site infections. The nonramdonized convenience sample consisted of 30 subjects who had central venous catheters in place less than 48 hours and who were able to give informed consent. A descriptive design was used and Pearson Correlational Coefficients were computed to examine the relationships between intrinsic factors, extrinsic factors and central venous catheter infections. Two cases of catheter related bacteremia were identified. No cases of site infection were documented. No significant relationships between intrinsic factors and central venous catheter infections were found. Four extrinsic factors showed a significant relationship to redness, a sign of site infection.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Medicine and Surgery.; Health Sciences, Nursing.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Murdaugh, Carolyn

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe relationship between intrinsic and extrinsic factors and central venous catheter infections in the acutely ill patienten_US
dc.creatorEdwards, Helen Frances, 1957-en_US
dc.contributor.authorEdwards, Helen Frances, 1957-en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to describe the relationship between intrinsic and extrinsic factors and central venous catheter infections in acutely ill patients. Intrinsic factors (inherent) included sex, age, diagnoses, surgical procedures, and medical history. Extrinsic factors (external) included central venous catheter variables and other invasive medical devices. Nosocomial central venous catheter infections were categorized as catheter related bacteremias and site infections. The nonramdonized convenience sample consisted of 30 subjects who had central venous catheters in place less than 48 hours and who were able to give informed consent. A descriptive design was used and Pearson Correlational Coefficients were computed to examine the relationships between intrinsic factors, extrinsic factors and central venous catheter infections. Two cases of catheter related bacteremia were identified. No cases of site infection were documented. No significant relationships between intrinsic factors and central venous catheter infections were found. Four extrinsic factors showed a significant relationship to redness, a sign of site infection.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Medicine and Surgery.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nursing.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMurdaugh, Carolynen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1343808en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b2688236xen_US
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