Fences as barriers to desert mule deer along canals in central Arizona

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/277866
Title:
Fences as barriers to desert mule deer along canals in central Arizona
Author:
Carmichael, Gregory Bruce, 1965-
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Water associated with the Central Arizona Project (CAP) and its delivery systems attract wildlife. Crossing structures, alternate water sources, and fences have been built to reduce wildlife mortality associated with canals. Their effectiveness, however, has not been evaluated. I assessed the effectiveness of a woven wire and an electric fence located on the CAP and Tonopah Canals, respectively. The purpose of these fences was to prevent desert mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus crooki) from entering canals. I established track plots to quantify differences in deer use between areas separated by the canals. I used line intercept transects to examine differences in the vegetation between the north and south sides of the CAP. Both types of fences were effective in keeping deer out of the canal. The north side of the CAP had more deer use and more ground cover than the south side. If future offshoot canals are small, they may be left unfenced, if follow-up studies reveal no significant wildlife mortality.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Agriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Krausman, Paul R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleFences as barriers to desert mule deer along canals in central Arizonaen_US
dc.creatorCarmichael, Gregory Bruce, 1965-en_US
dc.contributor.authorCarmichael, Gregory Bruce, 1965-en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractWater associated with the Central Arizona Project (CAP) and its delivery systems attract wildlife. Crossing structures, alternate water sources, and fences have been built to reduce wildlife mortality associated with canals. Their effectiveness, however, has not been evaluated. I assessed the effectiveness of a woven wire and an electric fence located on the CAP and Tonopah Canals, respectively. The purpose of these fences was to prevent desert mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus crooki) from entering canals. I established track plots to quantify differences in deer use between areas separated by the canals. I used line intercept transects to examine differences in the vegetation between the north and south sides of the CAP. Both types of fences were effective in keeping deer out of the canal. The north side of the CAP had more deer use and more ground cover than the south side. If future offshoot canals are small, they may be left unfenced, if follow-up studies reveal no significant wildlife mortality.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKrausman, Paul R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1343803en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b26882310en_US
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