Characterization of the role of serotonin in the regulation of phencyclidine's behavioral and electrophysiological effects

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/277846
Title:
Characterization of the role of serotonin in the regulation of phencyclidine's behavioral and electrophysiological effects
Author:
Harlan, John Timothy, 1964-
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Electrophysiological and behavioral methods were utilized in conjunction with either specific brain lesions or drug administration to evaluate serotonin's modulatory influence on phencyclidine's actions. Dorsal raphe (DR) and medial raphe (MR) nucleus lesions were preformed to destroy serotonin cell bodies, while ritanserin and parachloroamphetamine (PCA) were used to remove or inhibit serotonin. The DR lesions changed phencyclidine's electrophysiological response in only the VTA (A10), while the MR lesions effected only the SN (A9) neurons. Thus the DR innervates the VTA, and the MR innervates the SN. The PCA, ritanserin, and DR groups showed a potentiated locomotor response to phencyclidine with no change in the animals spontaneous activity. The MR group showed an increase in spontaneous activity, but when normalized for this, there was no potentiation of the phencyclidine effect. Thus, the drug potentiation of the locomotor hyperactivity appears to be mediated through the DR serotoninergic system and A10 dopamine system.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Neuroscience.; Health Sciences, Pharmacology.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
French, Edward D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleCharacterization of the role of serotonin in the regulation of phencyclidine's behavioral and electrophysiological effectsen_US
dc.creatorHarlan, John Timothy, 1964-en_US
dc.contributor.authorHarlan, John Timothy, 1964-en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractElectrophysiological and behavioral methods were utilized in conjunction with either specific brain lesions or drug administration to evaluate serotonin's modulatory influence on phencyclidine's actions. Dorsal raphe (DR) and medial raphe (MR) nucleus lesions were preformed to destroy serotonin cell bodies, while ritanserin and parachloroamphetamine (PCA) were used to remove or inhibit serotonin. The DR lesions changed phencyclidine's electrophysiological response in only the VTA (A10), while the MR lesions effected only the SN (A9) neurons. Thus the DR innervates the VTA, and the MR innervates the SN. The PCA, ritanserin, and DR groups showed a potentiated locomotor response to phencyclidine with no change in the animals spontaneous activity. The MR group showed an increase in spontaneous activity, but when normalized for this, there was no potentiation of the phencyclidine effect. Thus, the drug potentiation of the locomotor hyperactivity appears to be mediated through the DR serotoninergic system and A10 dopamine system.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Neuroscience.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Pharmacology.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFrench, Edward D.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1343611en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b26807075en_US
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