Ground penetrating radar investigations with applications for Southern Arizona

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/277838
Title:
Ground penetrating radar investigations with applications for Southern Arizona
Author:
McGill, James William, 1959-
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The goal of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) research at the University of Arizona is to improve our understanding use of GPR in a variety of settings. Observations from local surveys will form the basis for developing continuous profiling systems for future terrestrial and extraterrestrial applications. Determining electrical properties of in-situ soils and rock helps predict GPR behavior. A test site was constructed to measure the electrical properties of representative Southern Arizona Basin soils and to quantify the GPR response to these properties. In general, 100 and 300 MHz antennas are useful for surveys designed to locate large anomalies. The higher resolution of the 500 MHz antenna is valuable in most investigations and has been successful in mapping archaeological sites in the region. Signal processing of digitized GPR data clarifies the profile for interpretation and conditions the data for remote interpretation of the GPR profile through neural network pattern recognition of anomalies.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Geophysics.; Geotechnology.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sternberg, Ben K.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleGround penetrating radar investigations with applications for Southern Arizonaen_US
dc.creatorMcGill, James William, 1959-en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcGill, James William, 1959-en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe goal of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) research at the University of Arizona is to improve our understanding use of GPR in a variety of settings. Observations from local surveys will form the basis for developing continuous profiling systems for future terrestrial and extraterrestrial applications. Determining electrical properties of in-situ soils and rock helps predict GPR behavior. A test site was constructed to measure the electrical properties of representative Southern Arizona Basin soils and to quantify the GPR response to these properties. In general, 100 and 300 MHz antennas are useful for surveys designed to locate large anomalies. The higher resolution of the 500 MHz antenna is valuable in most investigations and has been successful in mapping archaeological sites in the region. Signal processing of digitized GPR data clarifies the profile for interpretation and conditions the data for remote interpretation of the GPR profile through neural network pattern recognition of anomalies.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectGeophysics.en_US
dc.subjectGeotechnology.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSternberg, Ben K.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1341470en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b26362910en_US
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