The effects of water stress on gas-exchange in Pinus brutia, var eldarica

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/277326
Title:
The effects of water stress on gas-exchange in Pinus brutia, var eldarica
Author:
Soumana, Diallo Amadou, 1957-
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Pinus brutia var. eldarica is often considered to possess photosynthetic characteristics that make it highly tolerant to drought conditions. However, very little is known about it's photosynthetic response to water stress under either laboratory or field imposed drought conditions. The purpose of this study was to utilize laboratory gas-exchange measurements to determine the effects of water stress and recovery from stress on photosynthetic capacity of potted Pinus brutia via. eldarica plants. Analysis of the rate assimilation (A) versus intercellular CO₂ (Cᵢ) data indicates that recovery of carboxylation efficiency (g'm) (i.e. Rubisco activity and amount) does occur after daily re-watering of moderately stressed (ψ₂ ≃ -2.0 MPa) Pinus brutia. However, these same data indicate that irreversible damage to cell membranes results in an inability to re-generate RubP. Although inferences on the effect of stress on A in field grown Pinus brutia is tenuous, these laboratory results indicate that Pinus brutia may not be as drought tolerant as commonly believed.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Plant Physiology.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Matthias, Allan D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe effects of water stress on gas-exchange in Pinus brutia, var eldaricaen_US
dc.creatorSoumana, Diallo Amadou, 1957-en_US
dc.contributor.authorSoumana, Diallo Amadou, 1957-en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPinus brutia var. eldarica is often considered to possess photosynthetic characteristics that make it highly tolerant to drought conditions. However, very little is known about it's photosynthetic response to water stress under either laboratory or field imposed drought conditions. The purpose of this study was to utilize laboratory gas-exchange measurements to determine the effects of water stress and recovery from stress on photosynthetic capacity of potted Pinus brutia via. eldarica plants. Analysis of the rate assimilation (A) versus intercellular CO₂ (Cᵢ) data indicates that recovery of carboxylation efficiency (g'm) (i.e. Rubisco activity and amount) does occur after daily re-watering of moderately stressed (ψ₂ ≃ -2.0 MPa) Pinus brutia. However, these same data indicate that irreversible damage to cell membranes results in an inability to re-generate RubP. Although inferences on the effect of stress on A in field grown Pinus brutia is tenuous, these laboratory results indicate that Pinus brutia may not be as drought tolerant as commonly believed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Plant Physiology.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMatthias, Allan D.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1341237en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b26330921en_US
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