Factors associated with professional nursing practice in medical-surgical nurses

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/277266
Title:
Factors associated with professional nursing practice in medical-surgical nurses
Author:
Palmer, Josephine Chiara
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to identify and describe factors perceived to be important to nursing practice by registered nurses. The sample, 170 medical-surgical nurses, was 37% of the total in the primary study (N = 455). An exploratory/descriptive design was used to content analyze the qualitative data obtained from one open-ended question asked in the Differentiated Group Professional Practice in Nursing project. Results showed two concepts in the conceptual framework, Group Cohesion and Job Satisfaction, with regard to Pay and Physician/Nurse Relationships, were supported. Other categories generated included the importance of Administrative Support, both Nursing and Non-Nursing, Education, Adequate Staffing, Flexibility in Hours, and Role Recognition. Another set of responses were categorized as Conflicts - Dissatisfiers. Categories generated included Entry into Practice, Non-Nursing Functions and Changing Attitudes.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Nurses -- Attitudes.; Nurses -- Job satisfaction.; Nursing -- Psychological aspects.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Murdaugh, Carolyn

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleFactors associated with professional nursing practice in medical-surgical nursesen_US
dc.creatorPalmer, Josephine Chiaraen_US
dc.contributor.authorPalmer, Josephine Chiaraen_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to identify and describe factors perceived to be important to nursing practice by registered nurses. The sample, 170 medical-surgical nurses, was 37% of the total in the primary study (N = 455). An exploratory/descriptive design was used to content analyze the qualitative data obtained from one open-ended question asked in the Differentiated Group Professional Practice in Nursing project. Results showed two concepts in the conceptual framework, Group Cohesion and Job Satisfaction, with regard to Pay and Physician/Nurse Relationships, were supported. Other categories generated included the importance of Administrative Support, both Nursing and Non-Nursing, Education, Adequate Staffing, Flexibility in Hours, and Role Recognition. Another set of responses were categorized as Conflicts - Dissatisfiers. Categories generated included Entry into Practice, Non-Nursing Functions and Changing Attitudes.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectNurses -- Attitudes.en_US
dc.subjectNurses -- Job satisfaction.en_US
dc.subjectNursing -- Psychological aspects.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMurdaugh, Carolynen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1339904en_US
dc.identifier.oclc23715851en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17665747en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.