Constitutive modeling of dilatant soils with associative kinematic hardening plasticity

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/277254
Title:
Constitutive modeling of dilatant soils with associative kinematic hardening plasticity
Author:
Abdulla, Ali Abdulhussein, 1967-
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In this study, a set of rules is established, which when implemented in the modeling of dilatant soils, within the framework of associative plasticity, enables very successful shear and dilatancy predictions. The proposed approach is based on a number of principles, the most important of which are: (1) The plasticity model must have a loading surface that hardens kinematically, and a failure surface that is perfectly plastic. (2) Experimental evidence shows that uniformly deformed sand samples dilate with a constant rate when they reach their ultimate strength value, while critical state is only achieved at very large strains. There is a unique point A on the loading surface that corresponds to the experimentally observed dilatation rate. The hardening rule must, therefore, ensure that the stress point approaches A as it approaches the failure surface. These principles are implemented in a plasticity model and compared to numerous published monotonic and cyclic tests, with varied stress paths, performed on a true triaxial apparatus. The agreement between experimental data and theoretical predictions is excellent.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Applied Mechanics.; Geotechnology.; Engineering, Civil.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kiousis, Panos D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleConstitutive modeling of dilatant soils with associative kinematic hardening plasticityen_US
dc.creatorAbdulla, Ali Abdulhussein, 1967-en_US
dc.contributor.authorAbdulla, Ali Abdulhussein, 1967-en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this study, a set of rules is established, which when implemented in the modeling of dilatant soils, within the framework of associative plasticity, enables very successful shear and dilatancy predictions. The proposed approach is based on a number of principles, the most important of which are: (1) The plasticity model must have a loading surface that hardens kinematically, and a failure surface that is perfectly plastic. (2) Experimental evidence shows that uniformly deformed sand samples dilate with a constant rate when they reach their ultimate strength value, while critical state is only achieved at very large strains. There is a unique point A on the loading surface that corresponds to the experimentally observed dilatation rate. The hardening rule must, therefore, ensure that the stress point approaches A as it approaches the failure surface. These principles are implemented in a plasticity model and compared to numerous published monotonic and cyclic tests, with varied stress paths, performed on a true triaxial apparatus. The agreement between experimental data and theoretical predictions is excellent.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectApplied Mechanics.en_US
dc.subjectGeotechnology.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Civil.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKiousis, Panos D.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1339880en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b26221913en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.