Possession centrality to self, perceptions of control, and the experience of disposition

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/277253
Title:
Possession centrality to self, perceptions of control, and the experience of disposition
Author:
Young, Melissa Martin, 1963-
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This research considers the relationship between possession centrality to self and perceptions of control on the antecedents, events, and consequences of the disposition, separation, giving up, and loss of possessions. The following dispositional behaviors are explored: (1) etic motivations of disposition; (2) methods of disposition; (3) emotional reactions to disposition; (4) etic meanings of disposition; and (5) replacement factors. Structured by a two-by -two, within-subjects research design, survey questionnaires and in-depth interviews are used to elicit retrospective data concerning four dispositional experiences--one from each cell in the research design. These data are then compared between high and low centrality possessions, high and low control dispositions, and their interactions. Although this study is exploratory, it provides suggestive evidence that possession centrality and perceptions of control are key dimensions which affect dispositional experiences. Furthermore, methods of disposition, possession types, and transitional events appear to coincide with these dimensions.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Business Administration, Marketing.; Education, Educational Psychology.; Education, Business.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Jaworski, Bernard J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titlePossession centrality to self, perceptions of control, and the experience of dispositionen_US
dc.creatorYoung, Melissa Martin, 1963-en_US
dc.contributor.authorYoung, Melissa Martin, 1963-en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis research considers the relationship between possession centrality to self and perceptions of control on the antecedents, events, and consequences of the disposition, separation, giving up, and loss of possessions. The following dispositional behaviors are explored: (1) etic motivations of disposition; (2) methods of disposition; (3) emotional reactions to disposition; (4) etic meanings of disposition; and (5) replacement factors. Structured by a two-by -two, within-subjects research design, survey questionnaires and in-depth interviews are used to elicit retrospective data concerning four dispositional experiences--one from each cell in the research design. These data are then compared between high and low centrality possessions, high and low control dispositions, and their interactions. Although this study is exploratory, it provides suggestive evidence that possession centrality and perceptions of control are key dimensions which affect dispositional experiences. Furthermore, methods of disposition, possession types, and transitional events appear to coincide with these dimensions.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBusiness Administration, Marketing.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Educational Psychology.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Business.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorJaworski, Bernard J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1339675en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b26213114en_US
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