Finite element analysis of continuous prestressed composite girders

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/277224
Title:
Finite element analysis of continuous prestressed composite girders
Author:
Tong, Wenxia, 1958-
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Prestressing a steel girder reduces the required structural steel weight, limits tension stresses in the section, increases the ultimate strength, and increases the fatigue resistance. The technique of prestressing with tendons can be used for strengthening of existing bridges as well as for construction of new bridges. This thesis presents an analytical study of the behavior of simply-supported and continuous prestressed composite girders and describes the benefits of prestressing steel in composite construction. Analytical models are developed and used as a basis for a computer program that calculates the stresses and displacements in the cables and the girder at discrete number of nodes along the length of the girder. The effects of design variables such as prestress force, tendon profile, eccentricity and tendon length are studied. The results indicate that prestressing is an effective means of increasing the load carrying capacity of simple-span as well as continuous composite girders.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Girders.; Composite construction.; Strains and stresses.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Saadatmanesh, Hamid

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleFinite element analysis of continuous prestressed composite girdersen_US
dc.creatorTong, Wenxia, 1958-en_US
dc.contributor.authorTong, Wenxia, 1958-en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPrestressing a steel girder reduces the required structural steel weight, limits tension stresses in the section, increases the ultimate strength, and increases the fatigue resistance. The technique of prestressing with tendons can be used for strengthening of existing bridges as well as for construction of new bridges. This thesis presents an analytical study of the behavior of simply-supported and continuous prestressed composite girders and describes the benefits of prestressing steel in composite construction. Analytical models are developed and used as a basis for a computer program that calculates the stresses and displacements in the cables and the girder at discrete number of nodes along the length of the girder. The effects of design variables such as prestress force, tendon profile, eccentricity and tendon length are studied. The results indicate that prestressing is an effective means of increasing the load carrying capacity of simple-span as well as continuous composite girders.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectGirders.en_US
dc.subjectComposite construction.en_US
dc.subjectStrains and stresses.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCivil Engineering and Engineering Mechanicsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSaadatmanesh, Hamiden_US
dc.identifier.proquest1339234en_US
dc.identifier.oclc23685925en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17657611en_US
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