Efficacy of handwashing as an aid in the control of rotavirus and Giardia transmission

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/277209
Title:
Efficacy of handwashing as an aid in the control of rotavirus and Giardia transmission
Author:
Manthriratna, Gothami Anoma, 1963-
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Diarrhea caused by rotavirus and Giardia is a major health problem among children attending day-care centers because of inadequate personnel hygiene. Epidemiological evidence suggesting person-to-person transmission of enteric pathogens has long been recognized. This study was initiated to investigate the effectiveness of handwashing for the removal of rotavirus and Giardia from contaminated hands. The palms of participant hands were innoculated with approximately 103 Giardia cysts or 105 plaque forming units of rotavirus and the effect of washing using tap water alone, a liquid soap or a bar soap on their removal was assessed. Handwashing with liquid soap was found to be very effective in the removal of rotavirus and Giardia cysts as compared to washing with bar soap or tap water alone. The overall recovery of viruses in both bar soap and liquid soap was low (0.03-22.5%), probably due to virus inactivation by the detergent.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Diarrhea, Infantile.; Viruses.; Giardia lamblia.; Hand washing.; Day care centers.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Microbiology and Immunology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Gerba, Charles P.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleEfficacy of handwashing as an aid in the control of rotavirus and Giardia transmissionen_US
dc.creatorManthriratna, Gothami Anoma, 1963-en_US
dc.contributor.authorManthriratna, Gothami Anoma, 1963-en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractDiarrhea caused by rotavirus and Giardia is a major health problem among children attending day-care centers because of inadequate personnel hygiene. Epidemiological evidence suggesting person-to-person transmission of enteric pathogens has long been recognized. This study was initiated to investigate the effectiveness of handwashing for the removal of rotavirus and Giardia from contaminated hands. The palms of participant hands were innoculated with approximately 103 Giardia cysts or 105 plaque forming units of rotavirus and the effect of washing using tap water alone, a liquid soap or a bar soap on their removal was assessed. Handwashing with liquid soap was found to be very effective in the removal of rotavirus and Giardia cysts as compared to washing with bar soap or tap water alone. The overall recovery of viruses in both bar soap and liquid soap was low (0.03-22.5%), probably due to virus inactivation by the detergent.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDiarrhea, Infantile.en_US
dc.subjectViruses.en_US
dc.subjectGiardia lamblia.en_US
dc.subjectHand washing.en_US
dc.subjectDay care centers.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMicrobiology and Immunologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGerba, Charles P.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1339216en_US
dc.identifier.oclc24351864en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b18424417en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b40686279en_US
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