Effects of prescribed fire on fuel accumulation rates and selected soil nutrients

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/277123
Title:
Effects of prescribed fire on fuel accumulation rates and selected soil nutrients
Author:
Christopherson, John Ostler, 1956-
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Fuel accumulation rate and total soil nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur following prescribed fires were studied. Three prescribed fires were conducted in S.E. Arizona ponderosa pine stands during the summers of 1979, 1980, and 1981. Samples of forest floor and larger diameter fuel and soil from the surface 1.5 inches and 1.5 to 3.0 inch layers were collected in the summer of 1981. Forest floor and total fuel accumulation averaged 5.4 to 6.7 and 6.3 to 8.9 tons/acre/year, respectively. Total nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur in the surface three inches of mineral soil were not significantly affected by burning. Soil nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur content averaged 0.21%, 344 ppm and 150 ppm, respectively, in the surface 1.5 inches and 0.11%, 285 ppm and 74 ppm, respectively, in the 1.5 to 3.0 inch layer.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Prescribed burning -- Arizona -- Santa Catalina Mountains.; Ponderosa pine.; Forest soils -- Arizona -- Santa Catalina Mountains.; Forest litter -- Arizona -- Santa Catalina Mountains.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Renewable Natural Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Zwolinski, Malcolm J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleEffects of prescribed fire on fuel accumulation rates and selected soil nutrientsen_US
dc.creatorChristopherson, John Ostler, 1956-en_US
dc.contributor.authorChristopherson, John Ostler, 1956-en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractFuel accumulation rate and total soil nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur following prescribed fires were studied. Three prescribed fires were conducted in S.E. Arizona ponderosa pine stands during the summers of 1979, 1980, and 1981. Samples of forest floor and larger diameter fuel and soil from the surface 1.5 inches and 1.5 to 3.0 inch layers were collected in the summer of 1981. Forest floor and total fuel accumulation averaged 5.4 to 6.7 and 6.3 to 8.9 tons/acre/year, respectively. Total nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur in the surface three inches of mineral soil were not significantly affected by burning. Soil nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur content averaged 0.21%, 344 ppm and 150 ppm, respectively, in the surface 1.5 inches and 0.11%, 285 ppm and 74 ppm, respectively, in the 1.5 to 3.0 inch layer.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPrescribed burning -- Arizona -- Santa Catalina Mountains.en_US
dc.subjectPonderosa pine.en_US
dc.subjectForest soils -- Arizona -- Santa Catalina Mountains.en_US
dc.subjectForest litter -- Arizona -- Santa Catalina Mountains.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorZwolinski, Malcolm J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1338516en_US
dc.identifier.oclc23117887en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17571868en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17571856en_US
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