Exercise protocols and their effects on quantitative respirator fit tests

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/277122
Title:
Exercise protocols and their effects on quantitative respirator fit tests
Author:
Boothe, Gregory David, 1956-
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A negative pressure quantitative fit testing device was used to test the effect exercise protocol has on leakage rates into a negative pressure respirator. Modified exercise protocols were developed for use with the negative pressure system. Aerosol data was analyzed to determine the effect exercises have had on leakage rates using other QNFT systems. Results show that the position of the head affects the amount of leakage into the facepiece. Mean leakage into the respirator mask increased for all positions tested in one phase of the study. However, statistical analysis of the data showed that the increase was not statistically significant. Aerosol data analysis also showed that increases in leakage into the mask were not statistically significant. Conclusions drawn from this study are that although movement of the head may affect the leakage into a respirator it is not significant enough to alter the protection afforded the worker.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Breathing apparatus -- Testing.; Human engineering.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Pharmcology and Toxicology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Crutchfield, Clifton; Ert, Mark van

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleExercise protocols and their effects on quantitative respirator fit testsen_US
dc.creatorBoothe, Gregory David, 1956-en_US
dc.contributor.authorBoothe, Gregory David, 1956-en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA negative pressure quantitative fit testing device was used to test the effect exercise protocol has on leakage rates into a negative pressure respirator. Modified exercise protocols were developed for use with the negative pressure system. Aerosol data was analyzed to determine the effect exercises have had on leakage rates using other QNFT systems. Results show that the position of the head affects the amount of leakage into the facepiece. Mean leakage into the respirator mask increased for all positions tested in one phase of the study. However, statistical analysis of the data showed that the increase was not statistically significant. Aerosol data analysis also showed that increases in leakage into the mask were not statistically significant. Conclusions drawn from this study are that although movement of the head may affect the leakage into a respirator it is not significant enough to alter the protection afforded the worker.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBreathing apparatus -- Testing.en_US
dc.subjectHuman engineering.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePharmcology and Toxicologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorCrutchfield, Cliftonen_US
dc.contributor.advisorErt, Mark vanen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1338515en_US
dc.identifier.oclc22960075en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17542789en_US
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