A three-dimensional analysis of flow and solute transport resulting from deep well injection into faulted stratigraphic units

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/277102
Title:
A three-dimensional analysis of flow and solute transport resulting from deep well injection into faulted stratigraphic units
Author:
Wallace, Michael Gary, 1958-
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
An analysis was performed of a Texas gulf coast hazardous waste injection well disposal system. The system was complicated by the presence of a fault which transected the injection interval. The existence of the fault presented the potential for enhanced vertical migration of the injected solutes via a tortuous path of interconnected, highly permeable sand units. Evaluation of this potential necessitated a fully three dimensional model which incorporated the arrangement of the alternating shales and sands and their associated discontinuities. Computer run time and memory limitations compelled a dissection of the problem into components, as well as the utilization of a specific mixture of conservative and realistic assumptions. The analysis indicated that within 10,000 years, the waste would advance vertically no further than one hundred feet into the overlying stratigraphy, and laterally no further than 24,000 feet from the point of injection.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Hazardous waste sites -- Leaching.; Injection wells.; Waste disposal in the ground.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Hydrology and Water Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Evans, Daniel

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleA three-dimensional analysis of flow and solute transport resulting from deep well injection into faulted stratigraphic unitsen_US
dc.creatorWallace, Michael Gary, 1958-en_US
dc.contributor.authorWallace, Michael Gary, 1958-en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAn analysis was performed of a Texas gulf coast hazardous waste injection well disposal system. The system was complicated by the presence of a fault which transected the injection interval. The existence of the fault presented the potential for enhanced vertical migration of the injected solutes via a tortuous path of interconnected, highly permeable sand units. Evaluation of this potential necessitated a fully three dimensional model which incorporated the arrangement of the alternating shales and sands and their associated discontinuities. Computer run time and memory limitations compelled a dissection of the problem into components, as well as the utilization of a specific mixture of conservative and realistic assumptions. The analysis indicated that within 10,000 years, the waste would advance vertically no further than one hundred feet into the overlying stratigraphy, and laterally no further than 24,000 feet from the point of injection.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHazardous waste sites -- Leaching.en_US
dc.subjectInjection wells.en_US
dc.subjectWaste disposal in the ground.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorEvans, Danielen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1337992en_US
dc.identifier.oclc23030361en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b1841946xen_US
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