Psychological birth position of adolescents abusing substances and attempting suicide

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/277096
Title:
Psychological birth position of adolescents abusing substances and attempting suicide
Author:
Schierbeek, Marvin Lee, 1953-
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study examined the relationship between psychological birth order and substance abuse and suicide in adolescents. It was hypothesized that adolescents operating from a perceived inferior position as measured by the Psychological Birth Order Instrument would be more likely to abuse substances and/or engage in self-destructive behavior. Ninety-five adolescents from Southern Arizona volunteered to participate in this study. The forty-eight treatment subjects were current in-patients at a psychiatric hospital. The control group consisted of forty-seven high school students. The results indicated that there was a difference in perceptions between adolescents in treatment versus those not in treatment for substance abuse and/or suicide. There was a significant relationship at the.005 level and it was concluded that adolescents operating from a perceived inferior position are more likely to abuse substances and/or attempt suicide.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Birth order.; Teenagers -- Arizona -- Attitudes.; Teenagers -- Suicidal behavior -- Arizona.; Teenagers -- Drug use -- Arizona.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Family and Consumer Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Newlon, Betty J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titlePsychological birth position of adolescents abusing substances and attempting suicideen_US
dc.creatorSchierbeek, Marvin Lee, 1953-en_US
dc.contributor.authorSchierbeek, Marvin Lee, 1953-en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the relationship between psychological birth order and substance abuse and suicide in adolescents. It was hypothesized that adolescents operating from a perceived inferior position as measured by the Psychological Birth Order Instrument would be more likely to abuse substances and/or engage in self-destructive behavior. Ninety-five adolescents from Southern Arizona volunteered to participate in this study. The forty-eight treatment subjects were current in-patients at a psychiatric hospital. The control group consisted of forty-seven high school students. The results indicated that there was a difference in perceptions between adolescents in treatment versus those not in treatment for substance abuse and/or suicide. There was a significant relationship at the.005 level and it was concluded that adolescents operating from a perceived inferior position are more likely to abuse substances and/or attempt suicide.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBirth order.en_US
dc.subjectTeenagers -- Arizona -- Attitudes.en_US
dc.subjectTeenagers -- Suicidal behavior -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectTeenagers -- Drug use -- Arizona.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineFamily and Consumer Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNewlon, Betty J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1337982en_US
dc.identifier.oclc23184384en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17590164en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17590152en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.