Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/277093
Title:
Compaction of asphaltic concrete by vibratory method
Author:
Rahman, Mohammad Asad Hikman, 1962-
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In this report a relationship is established between the variables of compaction temperature, compaction effort, mixture gradation and, density, air void content and stability of asphalt mixtures. The Marshall method of mix design was used, and Vibratory Kneading Compactor was utilized for compaction. Results include Marshall Stability and density-air void analysis for 4 and 6-inch specimens. It was found that the densities generally increased with increase of compaction temperatures and compaction efforts. From selected sets of 6-inch specimens, 4-inch cores were obtained. Density and stability studies were carried out on these cores and the results obtained were found to have the same trends. The air void content and voids in the mineral aggregates decreased with the increase of compaction effort. Stability increased with the increase in density. All the results found, indicate strong effects of compaction temperature and compactive effort on the amount of air voids, VMA, density, and stability of the mixes used.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Vibrated concrete.; Asphalt concrete.; Vibratory compacting.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Jimeneze, R. A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleCompaction of asphaltic concrete by vibratory methoden_US
dc.creatorRahman, Mohammad Asad Hikman, 1962-en_US
dc.contributor.authorRahman, Mohammad Asad Hikman, 1962-en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this report a relationship is established between the variables of compaction temperature, compaction effort, mixture gradation and, density, air void content and stability of asphalt mixtures. The Marshall method of mix design was used, and Vibratory Kneading Compactor was utilized for compaction. Results include Marshall Stability and density-air void analysis for 4 and 6-inch specimens. It was found that the densities generally increased with increase of compaction temperatures and compaction efforts. From selected sets of 6-inch specimens, 4-inch cores were obtained. Density and stability studies were carried out on these cores and the results obtained were found to have the same trends. The air void content and voids in the mineral aggregates decreased with the increase of compaction effort. Stability increased with the increase in density. All the results found, indicate strong effects of compaction temperature and compactive effort on the amount of air voids, VMA, density, and stability of the mixes used.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectVibrated concrete.en_US
dc.subjectAsphalt concrete.en_US
dc.subjectVibratory compacting.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCivil Engineering and Engineering Mechanicsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorJimeneze, R. A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1337979en_US
dc.identifier.oclc23056306en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17562600en_US
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