Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/277089
Title:
Symptomatology and life quality as predictors of emergent use
Author:
Moutafis, Roxanne Alexis
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A nursing concern for patients with chronic obstructive airway disease (COAD) is to assist the patient/family in improving adaptation strategies and self-care abilities. Identification of emotional and behavioral characteristics impacting on symptoms and life quality may predict individuals at risk for greater utilization of health care resources. The purpose of this descriptive study was to apply Traver's Prediction Formula for Emergent Use to a more general COAD population to determine if the formula would accurately predict those subjects who have high versus low emergent use of institutional health care resources. Fifty subjects with a range of COAD severity were studied. Subjects completed instruments which measured symptoms and life quality: the Bronchitis-Emphysema Symptom Checklist and the Sickness-Impact Profile. Findings demonstrated Traver's Formula predicted low emergent subjects with 76 percent accuracy, high emergent subjects with 53 percent accuracy and predicted the overall emergent status of subjects with 67 percent accuracy.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Lungs -- Diseases, Obstructive.; Medical care -- Utilization.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Traver, Gayle A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleSymptomatology and life quality as predictors of emergent useen_US
dc.creatorMoutafis, Roxanne Alexisen_US
dc.contributor.authorMoutafis, Roxanne Alexisen_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA nursing concern for patients with chronic obstructive airway disease (COAD) is to assist the patient/family in improving adaptation strategies and self-care abilities. Identification of emotional and behavioral characteristics impacting on symptoms and life quality may predict individuals at risk for greater utilization of health care resources. The purpose of this descriptive study was to apply Traver's Prediction Formula for Emergent Use to a more general COAD population to determine if the formula would accurately predict those subjects who have high versus low emergent use of institutional health care resources. Fifty subjects with a range of COAD severity were studied. Subjects completed instruments which measured symptoms and life quality: the Bronchitis-Emphysema Symptom Checklist and the Sickness-Impact Profile. Findings demonstrated Traver's Formula predicted low emergent subjects with 76 percent accuracy, high emergent subjects with 53 percent accuracy and predicted the overall emergent status of subjects with 67 percent accuracy.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectLungs -- Diseases, Obstructive.en_US
dc.subjectMedical care -- Utilization.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorTraver, Gayle A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1337973en_US
dc.identifier.oclc23278366en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17609094en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17609070en_US
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