The chloride to bromide ratio as an environmental groundwater tracer, with a field study at the Wellton-Mohawk Irrigation and Drainage District

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/277079
Title:
The chloride to bromide ratio as an environmental groundwater tracer, with a field study at the Wellton-Mohawk Irrigation and Drainage District
Author:
Goldowitz, Joshua, 1959-
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to determine if the chloride to bromide ratio (Cl/Br) of water imported via interbasin transfer can be used to trace the mixing of imported water with native ground water. Laboratory experiments and a chemical literature review indicate that chloride's and bromide's properties should make the Cl/Br a useful environmental ground-water tracer. This study has shown that the Cl/Br can be accurately quantified at environmental levels, is not attenuated by aquifer or soil media, is chemically stable, and is present in different levels in waters from different sources. Infiltration and mixing of irrigation water from the Colorado River (Cl/Br = 1300) with native ground water (Cl/Br = 630) was investigated at the Wellton-Mohawk Irrigation and Drainage District near Yuma, Arizona. The downgradient increase in the Cl/Br is correlated with distance from the upgradient limit of irrigation (r =.83), reflecting the chemical influence of infiltrating irrigation water.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Groundwater tracers -- Arizona -- Yuma Region.; Artificial groundwater recharge -- Arizona -- Yuma Region.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Hydrology and Water Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Davis, Stanley N.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe chloride to bromide ratio as an environmental groundwater tracer, with a field study at the Wellton-Mohawk Irrigation and Drainage Districten_US
dc.creatorGoldowitz, Joshua, 1959-en_US
dc.contributor.authorGoldowitz, Joshua, 1959-en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to determine if the chloride to bromide ratio (Cl/Br) of water imported via interbasin transfer can be used to trace the mixing of imported water with native ground water. Laboratory experiments and a chemical literature review indicate that chloride's and bromide's properties should make the Cl/Br a useful environmental ground-water tracer. This study has shown that the Cl/Br can be accurately quantified at environmental levels, is not attenuated by aquifer or soil media, is chemically stable, and is present in different levels in waters from different sources. Infiltration and mixing of irrigation water from the Colorado River (Cl/Br = 1300) with native ground water (Cl/Br = 630) was investigated at the Wellton-Mohawk Irrigation and Drainage District near Yuma, Arizona. The downgradient increase in the Cl/Br is correlated with distance from the upgradient limit of irrigation (r =.83), reflecting the chemical influence of infiltrating irrigation water.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectGroundwater tracers -- Arizona -- Yuma Region.en_US
dc.subjectArtificial groundwater recharge -- Arizona -- Yuma Region.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDavis, Stanley N.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1337653en_US
dc.identifier.oclc23039846en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17558189en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b18419495en_US
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