Human immunodeficiency virus and the autonomic nervous system: A study of cardiovascular reflexes

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/277035
Title:
Human immunodeficiency virus and the autonomic nervous system: A study of cardiovascular reflexes
Author:
Kaemingk, Kristine Lynn
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Recent reports suggest that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the virus causing AIDS, may cause autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction. ANS abnormalities on cardiovascular reflex tests have been demonstrated in HIV+ persons, persons infected with HIV, who have signs of illness or have used intravenous drugs. In this study the cardiovascular reflex function of 11 HIV+ homosexual or bisexual males meeting the Centers for Disease Control criteria for absence of illness was compared to that of 11 uninfected homosexual or bisexual males of similar ages. Somatic, depression and fatigue differences between groups were assessed using an ANS symptom checklist, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Profile of Mood States (POMS). Six of the 11 HIV+ subjects were impaired on the cardiovascular reflex tests. Differences on the BDI and POMS were not attributable to a depressive mood or despair, but rather to presence of mild symptoms of HIV infection and fatigue.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
AIDS (Disease) -- Psychological aspects.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kaszniak, Alfred W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleHuman immunodeficiency virus and the autonomic nervous system: A study of cardiovascular reflexesen_US
dc.creatorKaemingk, Kristine Lynnen_US
dc.contributor.authorKaemingk, Kristine Lynnen_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractRecent reports suggest that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the virus causing AIDS, may cause autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction. ANS abnormalities on cardiovascular reflex tests have been demonstrated in HIV+ persons, persons infected with HIV, who have signs of illness or have used intravenous drugs. In this study the cardiovascular reflex function of 11 HIV+ homosexual or bisexual males meeting the Centers for Disease Control criteria for absence of illness was compared to that of 11 uninfected homosexual or bisexual males of similar ages. Somatic, depression and fatigue differences between groups were assessed using an ANS symptom checklist, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Profile of Mood States (POMS). Six of the 11 HIV+ subjects were impaired on the cardiovascular reflex tests. Differences on the BDI and POMS were not attributable to a depressive mood or despair, but rather to presence of mild symptoms of HIV infection and fatigue.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAIDS (Disease) -- Psychological aspects.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKaszniak, Alfred W.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1337431en_US
dc.identifier.oclc22842399en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17509853en_US
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