Learning and behavioral outcome of coccidioidal meningitis in children

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/277010
Title:
Learning and behavioral outcome of coccidioidal meningitis in children
Author:
Ruggill, Jane Sanders, 1943-
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Coccidioidomycosis is a fungal infection endemic to the southwestern United States. Hematogenous dissemination of the etiologic agent produces a chronic basilar meningitis in a small percentage of children. While new and aggressive therapy has decreased mortality, children with coccidioidal meningitis (CM) continue to suffer significant morbidity. A comprehensive investigation of intellectual, achievement, and behavioral outcomes in a series of 9 children who were diagnosed and treated for CM at the Arizona Health Sciences Center between 1977 and 1988 was conducted. Nearest-age siblings were also evaluated. Findings revealed compromised cognitive abilities and an increased incidence of academic and behavioral difficulties in the patient group as compared to normative expectations and the performance of siblings. Results support the need for timely educational interventions to assist such patients in maximizing their potential in the academic environment.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Meningitis in children -- Psychological aspects.; Children -- Diseases.; Sick children -- Psychology.; Learning -- Physiological aspects.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kaszniak, Alfred W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleLearning and behavioral outcome of coccidioidal meningitis in childrenen_US
dc.creatorRuggill, Jane Sanders, 1943-en_US
dc.contributor.authorRuggill, Jane Sanders, 1943-en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractCoccidioidomycosis is a fungal infection endemic to the southwestern United States. Hematogenous dissemination of the etiologic agent produces a chronic basilar meningitis in a small percentage of children. While new and aggressive therapy has decreased mortality, children with coccidioidal meningitis (CM) continue to suffer significant morbidity. A comprehensive investigation of intellectual, achievement, and behavioral outcomes in a series of 9 children who were diagnosed and treated for CM at the Arizona Health Sciences Center between 1977 and 1988 was conducted. Nearest-age siblings were also evaluated. Findings revealed compromised cognitive abilities and an increased incidence of academic and behavioral difficulties in the patient group as compared to normative expectations and the performance of siblings. Results support the need for timely educational interventions to assist such patients in maximizing their potential in the academic environment.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectMeningitis in children -- Psychological aspects.en_US
dc.subjectChildren -- Diseases.en_US
dc.subjectSick children -- Psychology.en_US
dc.subjectLearning -- Physiological aspects.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKaszniak, Alfred W.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1336899en_US
dc.identifier.oclc23852048en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b1768769xen_US
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