Inducement of imagery in the service of learning sign language vocabulary

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/277007
Title:
Inducement of imagery in the service of learning sign language vocabulary
Author:
Rider, Cindy Ellerman
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The focus of this study was the inducement of imagery in order to retain sign language vocabulary items. Thirty-eight beginning sign language students were selected as subjects. Subjects were randomly assigned to two groups. The treatment group received instructions in the use of imagery mnemonics in order to better retain sign language vocabulary. Subjects in the control group were left to learn the vocabulary items by methods of their own choosing. Results of the statistical analyses indicated no significant difference between groups on posttest measures. However, there was a tendency toward an interaction between subjects' grade point averages and the treatments. The inducement of imagery in the treatment group was somewhat of an "equalizer" between subjects with high and low grade point averages. Additional analyses indicated that the inducement of imagery mnemonics in the treatment group was more successful for the poorer students and hindered the better students.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Sign language -- Study and teaching.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Educational Foundations and Administration
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Solomon, Gavriel; Slaughter, Sheila

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleInducement of imagery in the service of learning sign language vocabularyen_US
dc.creatorRider, Cindy Ellermanen_US
dc.contributor.authorRider, Cindy Ellermanen_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe focus of this study was the inducement of imagery in order to retain sign language vocabulary items. Thirty-eight beginning sign language students were selected as subjects. Subjects were randomly assigned to two groups. The treatment group received instructions in the use of imagery mnemonics in order to better retain sign language vocabulary. Subjects in the control group were left to learn the vocabulary items by methods of their own choosing. Results of the statistical analyses indicated no significant difference between groups on posttest measures. However, there was a tendency toward an interaction between subjects' grade point averages and the treatments. The inducement of imagery in the treatment group was somewhat of an "equalizer" between subjects with high and low grade point averages. Additional analyses indicated that the inducement of imagery mnemonics in the treatment group was more successful for the poorer students and hindered the better students.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectSign language -- Study and teaching.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Foundations and Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSolomon, Gavrielen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSlaughter, Sheilaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1336715en_US
dc.identifier.oclc22150418en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17364243en_US
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