Application of the BFGS quasi-Newton method to slope stability analysis

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276994
Title:
Application of the BFGS quasi-Newton method to slope stability analysis
Author:
Al-Karni, Awad, 1962-
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Mana computer programs have been developed for solving slope stability problems. Since slope stability problems can be characterized as optimization problems, many optimization techniques can be used for searching for the lowest safety factor for a given problem and the corresponding critical slip surface. Most of the slope stability programs use the direct search method which requires only the function value (i.e., safety factor value). In this thesis, a new optimization technique, the Broyden (1970), Fletcher (1970), Goldfarb (1970), and Shanno (1970) (BFGS) quasi-Newton optimization method, is used in conjunction with the STABR program of Lefebvre (1971) to solve slope stability problems. This method of optimization requires the function value and the first derivative value, which can be found by the finite difference method. A new program CSLIP3, incorporating the BFGS technique, is used to solve a variety of realistic slope stability problems. It is determined that CSLIP3 is reliable and efficient.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Slopes (Soil mechanics) -- Computer programs.; Soil stabilization.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Nowatzki, Edward

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleApplication of the BFGS quasi-Newton method to slope stability analysisen_US
dc.creatorAl-Karni, Awad, 1962-en_US
dc.contributor.authorAl-Karni, Awad, 1962-en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractMana computer programs have been developed for solving slope stability problems. Since slope stability problems can be characterized as optimization problems, many optimization techniques can be used for searching for the lowest safety factor for a given problem and the corresponding critical slip surface. Most of the slope stability programs use the direct search method which requires only the function value (i.e., safety factor value). In this thesis, a new optimization technique, the Broyden (1970), Fletcher (1970), Goldfarb (1970), and Shanno (1970) (BFGS) quasi-Newton optimization method, is used in conjunction with the STABR program of Lefebvre (1971) to solve slope stability problems. This method of optimization requires the function value and the first derivative value, which can be found by the finite difference method. A new program CSLIP3, incorporating the BFGS technique, is used to solve a variety of realistic slope stability problems. It is determined that CSLIP3 is reliable and efficient.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectSlopes (Soil mechanics) -- Computer programs.en_US
dc.subjectSoil stabilization.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCivil Engineering and Engineering Mechanicsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNowatzki, Edwarden_US
dc.identifier.proquest1336696en_US
dc.identifier.oclc22852740en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17510430en_US
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