The applicability of boron isotopes in determining fate and transport of leachate from electric utility solid waste

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276980
Title:
The applicability of boron isotopes in determining fate and transport of leachate from electric utility solid waste
Author:
Davidson, Gregg Randall, 1963-
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The boron isotopic ratios of three contaminated ground water samples and of leachate from four fly ash samples are shown to be significantly different than the isotopic ratio of naturally occurring boron in a selected ground water. Analysis is performed using thermal ionization mass spectrometry with a precision of less than 1 per mil. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is shown to be ineffective for this application. Boron is isolated from solution and concentrated using Amberlite IRA-743 resin with no isotopic fractionation observed. Boron desorption from fly ash is shown to be rapid. Boron isotopic analysis is shown to be a superior method to boron concentration analysis for identifying leachate in a ground water, (1) at the outer limits of a leachate plume, and, (2) when the difference between the boron concentration of the leachate and background water is small. The degree of contamination can be determined if both end members are known.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Water quality.; Boron.; Groundwater tracers.; Leachate -- Environmental aspects.; Electric power-plants -- Environmental aspects.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Hydrology and Water Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Bassett, R. L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe applicability of boron isotopes in determining fate and transport of leachate from electric utility solid wasteen_US
dc.creatorDavidson, Gregg Randall, 1963-en_US
dc.contributor.authorDavidson, Gregg Randall, 1963-en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe boron isotopic ratios of three contaminated ground water samples and of leachate from four fly ash samples are shown to be significantly different than the isotopic ratio of naturally occurring boron in a selected ground water. Analysis is performed using thermal ionization mass spectrometry with a precision of less than 1 per mil. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is shown to be ineffective for this application. Boron is isolated from solution and concentrated using Amberlite IRA-743 resin with no isotopic fractionation observed. Boron desorption from fly ash is shown to be rapid. Boron isotopic analysis is shown to be a superior method to boron concentration analysis for identifying leachate in a ground water, (1) at the outer limits of a leachate plume, and, (2) when the difference between the boron concentration of the leachate and background water is small. The degree of contamination can be determined if both end members are known.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectWater quality.en_US
dc.subjectBoron.en_US
dc.subjectGroundwater tracers.en_US
dc.subjectLeachate -- Environmental aspects.en_US
dc.subjectElectric power-plants -- Environmental aspects.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBassett, R. L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1336676en_US
dc.identifier.oclc22638775en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17472477en_US
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