Implicit and explicit memory in Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276974
Title:
Implicit and explicit memory in Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease
Author:
Bondi, Mark William, 1964-
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Several tasks examined implicit and explicit memory in matched samples of Alzheimer's (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, and healthy elderly subjects. Lexical priming, pursuit-rotor tracking, and a fragmented pictures test, followed by explicit memory tests, were given. AD patients were impaired on all explicit tests and on lexical priming, but were intact on pursuit-rotor tracking and the procedural learning (PL) component of the fragmented pictures test. PD patients were significantly better than AD patients on all explicit memory tests, but were selectively impaired on the PL component of the fragmented pictures test. Finally, a mirror reading test was given to the PD patients and matched control subjects, with no significant differences in performance between the two groups demonstrated. Results are discussed in terms of hypothetical cognitive processes and brain circuits underlying different explicit and implicit memory domains.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Memory in old age.; Alzheimer's disease -- Patients.; Parkinson's disease -- Patients.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kaszniak, Alfred W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleImplicit and explicit memory in Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's diseaseen_US
dc.creatorBondi, Mark William, 1964-en_US
dc.contributor.authorBondi, Mark William, 1964-en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSeveral tasks examined implicit and explicit memory in matched samples of Alzheimer's (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, and healthy elderly subjects. Lexical priming, pursuit-rotor tracking, and a fragmented pictures test, followed by explicit memory tests, were given. AD patients were impaired on all explicit tests and on lexical priming, but were intact on pursuit-rotor tracking and the procedural learning (PL) component of the fragmented pictures test. PD patients were significantly better than AD patients on all explicit memory tests, but were selectively impaired on the PL component of the fragmented pictures test. Finally, a mirror reading test was given to the PD patients and matched control subjects, with no significant differences in performance between the two groups demonstrated. Results are discussed in terms of hypothetical cognitive processes and brain circuits underlying different explicit and implicit memory domains.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectMemory in old age.en_US
dc.subjectAlzheimer's disease -- Patients.en_US
dc.subjectParkinson's disease -- Patients.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKaszniak, Alfred W.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1336669en_US
dc.identifier.oclc22338064en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17407746en_US
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