A theoretical and experimental study of the feasibility of high temperature ultrasound hyperthermia

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276971
Title:
A theoretical and experimental study of the feasibility of high temperature ultrasound hyperthermia
Author:
Billard, Bonnie Elizabeth, 1964-
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this research was to investigate the feasibility of using high temperature ultrasonic pulses to administer therapeutic hyperthermia treatments independent of changes in blood perfusion and tissue properties. The use of a computer simulation program was used to study the effects of blood perfusion, tissue properties, transducer characteristics, and treatment geometry on the temperature elevation and thermal dose delivered by short high temperature ultrasonic pulses. Experiments were conducted in vitro and in vivo to investigate the effects of blood perfusion changes. Other experiments were carried out in dog thigh muscle to determine the effects of changes in tissue properties. A final study was done where murine melanoma in mice were treated with high temperature ultrasound. Results show that shorter pulse lengths (≤ 2 s) and smaller focal diameters (≤ 3 mm) give practically perfusion independent temperature elevation and thermal dose. Normal fluctuations in tissue properties should not have a significant effect on the treatment provided that proper choice of transducer is made for each individual application. High temperature ultrasonic pulses have also been shown to induce tumor responses. Based on this research, this technique is a feasible means of administering hyperthermia for cancer therapy.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Thermotherapy.; Cancer -- Thermotherapy.; Ultrasonic waves -- Therapeutic use.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Roemer, Robert B.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleA theoretical and experimental study of the feasibility of high temperature ultrasound hyperthermiaen_US
dc.creatorBillard, Bonnie Elizabeth, 1964-en_US
dc.contributor.authorBillard, Bonnie Elizabeth, 1964-en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this research was to investigate the feasibility of using high temperature ultrasonic pulses to administer therapeutic hyperthermia treatments independent of changes in blood perfusion and tissue properties. The use of a computer simulation program was used to study the effects of blood perfusion, tissue properties, transducer characteristics, and treatment geometry on the temperature elevation and thermal dose delivered by short high temperature ultrasonic pulses. Experiments were conducted in vitro and in vivo to investigate the effects of blood perfusion changes. Other experiments were carried out in dog thigh muscle to determine the effects of changes in tissue properties. A final study was done where murine melanoma in mice were treated with high temperature ultrasound. Results show that shorter pulse lengths (≤ 2 s) and smaller focal diameters (≤ 3 mm) give practically perfusion independent temperature elevation and thermal dose. Normal fluctuations in tissue properties should not have a significant effect on the treatment provided that proper choice of transducer is made for each individual application. High temperature ultrasonic pulses have also been shown to induce tumor responses. Based on this research, this technique is a feasible means of administering hyperthermia for cancer therapy.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectThermotherapy.en_US
dc.subjectCancer -- Thermotherapy.en_US
dc.subjectUltrasonic waves -- Therapeutic use.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAerospace and Mechanical Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRoemer, Robert B.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1336666en_US
dc.identifier.oclc22646933en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17473123en_US
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