Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276963
Title:
Hydrophobic partitioning of the bacteriophage MS-2
Author:
Kroeger, Thomas William, 1952-
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In batch experiments at pH's 5 and 7, the partitioning of MS-2 between water and silica (unbonded) was compared with the partitioning between water and silica with 6.5 percent of the surface covered by hydrophobic C18 chains (bonded). The roles of double-layer and van der Waals forces in partitioning were explored by modeling the potential energies of interaction. MS-2 adsorption to unbonded silica was negligible at pH 7, but did occur at pH 5. Adsorption was independent of pH with the bonded silica and approximately 2.6 orders of magnitude greater than the unbonded at pH 5, suggesting the importance of hydrophobic partitioning. The total potential energies of interaction, which closely approach the pH-independent van der Waals potentials, are similar in magnitude for all pH's or silica types, and have no positive (repulsive) values. The insignificant contribution of the double-layer potentials suggests that these pH-dependent forces may not account for the pH-dependent adsorption observed with the unbonded silica.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Colloids.; Bacteriophages.; Water -- Purification.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Hydrology and Water Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Bales, Roger C.; Gerba, Charles P.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleHydrophobic partitioning of the bacteriophage MS-2en_US
dc.creatorKroeger, Thomas William, 1952-en_US
dc.contributor.authorKroeger, Thomas William, 1952-en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn batch experiments at pH's 5 and 7, the partitioning of MS-2 between water and silica (unbonded) was compared with the partitioning between water and silica with 6.5 percent of the surface covered by hydrophobic C18 chains (bonded). The roles of double-layer and van der Waals forces in partitioning were explored by modeling the potential energies of interaction. MS-2 adsorption to unbonded silica was negligible at pH 7, but did occur at pH 5. Adsorption was independent of pH with the bonded silica and approximately 2.6 orders of magnitude greater than the unbonded at pH 5, suggesting the importance of hydrophobic partitioning. The total potential energies of interaction, which closely approach the pH-independent van der Waals potentials, are similar in magnitude for all pH's or silica types, and have no positive (repulsive) values. The insignificant contribution of the double-layer potentials suggests that these pH-dependent forces may not account for the pH-dependent adsorption observed with the unbonded silica.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectColloids.en_US
dc.subjectBacteriophages.en_US
dc.subjectWater -- Purification.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBales, Roger C.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorGerba, Charles P.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1336552en_US
dc.identifier.oclc22577607en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17457294en_US
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