The use of fibrous reinforced concrete as a structural repair alternative

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276956
Title:
The use of fibrous reinforced concrete as a structural repair alternative
Author:
Baun, Mark Douglas, 1957-
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This thesis evaluates the use of fibrous reinforced concrete as a viable structural repair alternative. An independent laboratory investigation was conducted to substantiate the validity of the marketed claims of Polypropylene Fiber Reinforced Concrete (PFRC) and of Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete (SFRC) to improve the long-term performance of conventional portland cement concrete. The study found that SFRC significantly increases the compression strength, flexural behavior, and material toughness of PCC, whereas the test response for PFRC yielded minimal contributory strengths. The work examines the function of fibers; FRC's historical background, prevalent economic considerations, and modern repair applicational developments; remedies to overcome the negative aspects of SFRC; current research programs; and future trends. The author recommends trial field demonstration of Steel Fiber Reinforced Micro-Silica Dense Concrete (SFR-MSDC) as a cost-competitive material alternate in lieu of non-fibrous Latex-Modified Concrete (LMC) to more proficiently rehabilitate fatigue-distressed bridge decks.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Reinforced concrete.; Concrete -- Expansion and contraction.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Mining and Geological Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Glass, Charles E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe use of fibrous reinforced concrete as a structural repair alternativeen_US
dc.creatorBaun, Mark Douglas, 1957-en_US
dc.contributor.authorBaun, Mark Douglas, 1957-en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis evaluates the use of fibrous reinforced concrete as a viable structural repair alternative. An independent laboratory investigation was conducted to substantiate the validity of the marketed claims of Polypropylene Fiber Reinforced Concrete (PFRC) and of Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete (SFRC) to improve the long-term performance of conventional portland cement concrete. The study found that SFRC significantly increases the compression strength, flexural behavior, and material toughness of PCC, whereas the test response for PFRC yielded minimal contributory strengths. The work examines the function of fibers; FRC's historical background, prevalent economic considerations, and modern repair applicational developments; remedies to overcome the negative aspects of SFRC; current research programs; and future trends. The author recommends trial field demonstration of Steel Fiber Reinforced Micro-Silica Dense Concrete (SFR-MSDC) as a cost-competitive material alternate in lieu of non-fibrous Latex-Modified Concrete (LMC) to more proficiently rehabilitate fatigue-distressed bridge decks.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectReinforced concrete.en_US
dc.subjectConcrete -- Expansion and contraction.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMining and Geological Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGlass, Charles E.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1336542en_US
dc.identifier.oclc22577647en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17457312en_US
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