The effects of activated carbon adsorption and ozonation on trihalomethane speciation

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276953
Title:
The effects of activated carbon adsorption and ozonation on trihalomethane speciation
Author:
Tan, Lo, 1963-
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Two surface water sources in the southwestern United States, Colorado River Water (CRW) and California State Project Water (SPW), were studied in bench-scale experiments examining two Trihalomethane (THM) precursor removal processes, activated carbon adsorption and ozone oxidation. Both source water contained bromide (Br-) ion leading to brominated THMs upon chlorination. Activated carbon removed THM precursors, as measured by dissolved organic carbon (DOC), while having little effect on bromide. The net result was an increase in the ratio of Br-/DOC and an increase in the relative abundance of brominated THMs. Ozone oxidized higher molecular weight precursor molecules into lower molecular weight by-products which were less reactive with chlorine. Moreover, ozonation transformed Br- to hypobromous acid (an "in-situ" oxidant), leading to an increase in the percentage of brominated THMs.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Trihalomethanes.; Water -- Purification -- Organic compounds removal.; Water -- Pollution -- Colorado River (Colo.-Mexico); Water -- Pollution -- California.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Amy, Gary L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe effects of activated carbon adsorption and ozonation on trihalomethane speciationen_US
dc.creatorTan, Lo, 1963-en_US
dc.contributor.authorTan, Lo, 1963-en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractTwo surface water sources in the southwestern United States, Colorado River Water (CRW) and California State Project Water (SPW), were studied in bench-scale experiments examining two Trihalomethane (THM) precursor removal processes, activated carbon adsorption and ozone oxidation. Both source water contained bromide (Br-) ion leading to brominated THMs upon chlorination. Activated carbon removed THM precursors, as measured by dissolved organic carbon (DOC), while having little effect on bromide. The net result was an increase in the ratio of Br-/DOC and an increase in the relative abundance of brominated THMs. Ozone oxidized higher molecular weight precursor molecules into lower molecular weight by-products which were less reactive with chlorine. Moreover, ozonation transformed Br- to hypobromous acid (an "in-situ" oxidant), leading to an increase in the percentage of brominated THMs.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectTrihalomethanes.en_US
dc.subjectWater -- Purification -- Organic compounds removal.en_US
dc.subjectWater -- Pollution -- Colorado River (Colo.-Mexico)en_US
dc.subjectWater -- Pollution -- California.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCivil Engineering and Engineering Mechanicsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorAmy, Gary L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1336355en_US
dc.identifier.oclc22478024en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17437817en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17437751en_US
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