Validation of a vehicle mobility computer model for heavy earthmoving equipment

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276946
Title:
Validation of a vehicle mobility computer model for heavy earthmoving equipment
Author:
Matthews, Patricia Aileen, 1963-
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The computer program WHEEL is a mathematical model which predicts off-road vehicle performance characteristics. The program was developed using empirical relationships resulting from mobility tests on conventional-sized trucks and tires. The model was subsequently validated by comparing the model's predicted values of vehicle performance parameters, such as net drawbar pull, slip, sinkage and torque, with field test results for conventional-sized vehicles. However, validity of the model for predicting the off-road mobility of vehicles with large diameter tires was not established. The purpose of this study was to provide this validation. Values of net drawbar pull and slip for a Case 2390 tractor with 70.2" diameter driven wheels predicted by computer program WHEEL compare favorably with traction data obtained from tractor performance tests conducted by the University of Arizona Department of Agricultural Engineering. Therefore, the model may be used confidently to analyze performance of vehicles with large diameter wheels.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
All terrain vehicles -- Off-road operation -- Computer simulation.; Tractors -- Off-road operation -- Computer simulation.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Nowatzki, Edward A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleValidation of a vehicle mobility computer model for heavy earthmoving equipmenten_US
dc.creatorMatthews, Patricia Aileen, 1963-en_US
dc.contributor.authorMatthews, Patricia Aileen, 1963-en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe computer program WHEEL is a mathematical model which predicts off-road vehicle performance characteristics. The program was developed using empirical relationships resulting from mobility tests on conventional-sized trucks and tires. The model was subsequently validated by comparing the model's predicted values of vehicle performance parameters, such as net drawbar pull, slip, sinkage and torque, with field test results for conventional-sized vehicles. However, validity of the model for predicting the off-road mobility of vehicles with large diameter tires was not established. The purpose of this study was to provide this validation. Values of net drawbar pull and slip for a Case 2390 tractor with 70.2" diameter driven wheels predicted by computer program WHEEL compare favorably with traction data obtained from tractor performance tests conducted by the University of Arizona Department of Agricultural Engineering. Therefore, the model may be used confidently to analyze performance of vehicles with large diameter wheels.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAll terrain vehicles -- Off-road operation -- Computer simulation.en_US
dc.subjectTractors -- Off-road operation -- Computer simulation.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCivil Engineering and Engineering Mechanicsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNowatzki, Edward A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1336349en_US
dc.identifier.oclc22498503en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17444299en_US
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