An assessment of the impact of grouped item prompts versus single item prompts for human computer interface design

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276934
Title:
An assessment of the impact of grouped item prompts versus single item prompts for human computer interface design
Author:
Wilson, Rory Howard, 1957-
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Current research in screen design for human computer interaction has demonstrated that user task performance is influenced by placement, prompting methodology, and screen complexity. To assess the difference between a grouped item screen prompt and a series of single item screen prompts, a field experiment in a semiconductor manufacturing facility was designed. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of two groups to use a data entry system. Seven of the screen prompts differed between the two groups. During the four weeks of the study, a significant difference was measured between groups. The group screen users had lower task times for all four weeks. No significant correlation exists between work experience, performance review scores, or designated work shift. A strong negative correlation exists between frequency of system usage and task time. No difference was noted for measured errors. Subjective scores significantly favored the group screen design.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Human-computer interaction.; User interfaces (Computer systems)
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Management and Policy
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Tansik, David A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAn assessment of the impact of grouped item prompts versus single item prompts for human computer interface designen_US
dc.creatorWilson, Rory Howard, 1957-en_US
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Rory Howard, 1957-en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractCurrent research in screen design for human computer interaction has demonstrated that user task performance is influenced by placement, prompting methodology, and screen complexity. To assess the difference between a grouped item screen prompt and a series of single item screen prompts, a field experiment in a semiconductor manufacturing facility was designed. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of two groups to use a data entry system. Seven of the screen prompts differed between the two groups. During the four weeks of the study, a significant difference was measured between groups. The group screen users had lower task times for all four weeks. No significant correlation exists between work experience, performance review scores, or designated work shift. A strong negative correlation exists between frequency of system usage and task time. No difference was noted for measured errors. Subjective scores significantly favored the group screen design.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHuman-computer interaction.en_US
dc.subjectUser interfaces (Computer systems)en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineManagement and Policyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorTansik, David A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1335861en_US
dc.identifier.oclc21023365en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17139855en_US
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