Effect of dietary methionine on selenomethionine metabolism and utilization for selenoproteins

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276933
Title:
Effect of dietary methionine on selenomethionine metabolism and utilization for selenoproteins
Author:
Waschulewski, Ingo Herbert, 1962-
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The effects of dietary methionine (Met) on the utilization of selenium (Se) from stored tissue Se and dietary selenomethionine (SeMet) for glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) synthesis were studied in male rats. Plasma, liver and muscle Se significantly increased when rats were fed 0.5 mg Se/kg diet as SeMet in a Met-deficient diet for 21 d, whereas tissue GSH-Px activities decreased 43-50% during the SeMet supplementation period, suggesting that Se is deposited as SeMet in general body proteins. By calculation, a significant lower percentage of Se was associated with GSH-Px in Met-deficient as compared to Met-supplemented rats. Dietary Met supplementation increased the incorporation of 75Se from 75SeMet into specific rat selenoproteins in addition to liver GSH-Px. Overall, these results suggest that intact SeMet is preferentially incorporated non-specifically into general body proteins in Met-deficient rats, whereas with supplemental Met, more SeMet is degraded and the released Se used for specific selenoprotein synthesis. (Abstract shortened with permission of author.)
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Methionine.; Selenium.; Trace elements in animal nutrition.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nutritional Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sunde, Roger A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleEffect of dietary methionine on selenomethionine metabolism and utilization for selenoproteinsen_US
dc.creatorWaschulewski, Ingo Herbert, 1962-en_US
dc.contributor.authorWaschulewski, Ingo Herbert, 1962-en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe effects of dietary methionine (Met) on the utilization of selenium (Se) from stored tissue Se and dietary selenomethionine (SeMet) for glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) synthesis were studied in male rats. Plasma, liver and muscle Se significantly increased when rats were fed 0.5 mg Se/kg diet as SeMet in a Met-deficient diet for 21 d, whereas tissue GSH-Px activities decreased 43-50% during the SeMet supplementation period, suggesting that Se is deposited as SeMet in general body proteins. By calculation, a significant lower percentage of Se was associated with GSH-Px in Met-deficient as compared to Met-supplemented rats. Dietary Met supplementation increased the incorporation of 75Se from 75SeMet into specific rat selenoproteins in addition to liver GSH-Px. Overall, these results suggest that intact SeMet is preferentially incorporated non-specifically into general body proteins in Met-deficient rats, whereas with supplemental Met, more SeMet is degraded and the released Se used for specific selenoprotein synthesis. (Abstract shortened with permission of author.)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectMethionine.en_US
dc.subjectSelenium.en_US
dc.subjectTrace elements in animal nutrition.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNutritional Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSunde, Roger A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1335860en_US
dc.identifier.oclc22607788en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17462952en_US
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