Effectiveness of dominant Rhizobium meliloti indigenous to Arizona soil

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276929
Title:
Effectiveness of dominant Rhizobium meliloti indigenous to Arizona soil
Author:
Shishido, Masahiro, 1960-
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A total of 200 Rhizobium meliloti isolates were sampled from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) nodules in five uninoculated fields throughout Arizona. Dominant strains (≥ 20% nodule occupancy at each site) were identified using plasmid profile analysis and intrinsic antibiotic resistance patterns. The major dominant strains and a commercial strain (102F77b) were evaluated for their N fixing effectiveness in a Leonard jar study. All strains were highly effective, and no significant differences were found (p ≥ 0.05) in shoot weight, root weight, nodule weight, acetylene reduction and total N content among the strain treatments. These effective dominant R. meliloti strains indigenous to Arizona soil probably contribute to the state's high alfalfa yield. Furthermore, indigenous strains AZTCYJ, AZSC, and AZY have potential as inoculants for arid lands due to their high effectiveness and unique resistances to extreme abiotic stresses present in arid land soils.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Nitrifying bacteria -- Arizona.; Soil microbiology -- Arizona.; Alfalfa -- Field experiments.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Soil and Water Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleEffectiveness of dominant Rhizobium meliloti indigenous to Arizona soilen_US
dc.creatorShishido, Masahiro, 1960-en_US
dc.contributor.authorShishido, Masahiro, 1960-en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA total of 200 Rhizobium meliloti isolates were sampled from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) nodules in five uninoculated fields throughout Arizona. Dominant strains (≥ 20% nodule occupancy at each site) were identified using plasmid profile analysis and intrinsic antibiotic resistance patterns. The major dominant strains and a commercial strain (102F77b) were evaluated for their N fixing effectiveness in a Leonard jar study. All strains were highly effective, and no significant differences were found (p ≥ 0.05) in shoot weight, root weight, nodule weight, acetylene reduction and total N content among the strain treatments. These effective dominant R. meliloti strains indigenous to Arizona soil probably contribute to the state's high alfalfa yield. Furthermore, indigenous strains AZTCYJ, AZSC, and AZY have potential as inoculants for arid lands due to their high effectiveness and unique resistances to extreme abiotic stresses present in arid land soils.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectNitrifying bacteria -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectSoil microbiology -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectAlfalfa -- Field experiments.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSoil and Water Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1335852en_US
dc.identifier.oclc22498776en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b1744438xen_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17444354en_US
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