Need for cognition, ambiguity tolerance and symbol systems: An initial exploration

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276850
Title:
Need for cognition, ambiguity tolerance and symbol systems: An initial exploration
Author:
Fountain, Amy Velita, 1963-
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study explored the interaction between three individual variables, need for cognition and tolerance of ambiguity, and the symbol system used in messages. Goodman's (1976) dimension of notationality of systems is proposed as the continuum of interest upon which sources of information vary. It was hypothesized that high tolerance for ambiguity and need for cognition would lead to increased numbers of interpretations of nonnotational messages over notational ones, and over people low in these traits. Methods utilized in the study are overviewed. Results indicate that subjects high in need for cognition do generate more interpretations of messages in general than do others, however no effect was found for ambiguity tolerance or for message type. Reasons for these results are offered, and directions for further research suggested.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Communication -- Methodology.; Content analysis (Communication); Communication -- Psychological aspects.; Language arts -- Psychological aspects.; Poetry -- Social aspects.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Communication
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Williams, David A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleNeed for cognition, ambiguity tolerance and symbol systems: An initial explorationen_US
dc.creatorFountain, Amy Velita, 1963-en_US
dc.contributor.authorFountain, Amy Velita, 1963-en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study explored the interaction between three individual variables, need for cognition and tolerance of ambiguity, and the symbol system used in messages. Goodman's (1976) dimension of notationality of systems is proposed as the continuum of interest upon which sources of information vary. It was hypothesized that high tolerance for ambiguity and need for cognition would lead to increased numbers of interpretations of nonnotational messages over notational ones, and over people low in these traits. Methods utilized in the study are overviewed. Results indicate that subjects high in need for cognition do generate more interpretations of messages in general than do others, however no effect was found for ambiguity tolerance or for message type. Reasons for these results are offered, and directions for further research suggested.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectCommunication -- Methodology.en_US
dc.subjectContent analysis (Communication)en_US
dc.subjectCommunication -- Psychological aspects.en_US
dc.subjectLanguage arts -- Psychological aspects.en_US
dc.subjectPoetry -- Social aspects.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWilliams, David A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1335427en_US
dc.identifier.oclc20362056en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b16987524en_US
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