Mountain sheep habitat characteristics in the Pusch Ridge Wilderness, Arizona

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276839
Title:
Mountain sheep habitat characteristics in the Pusch Ridge Wilderness, Arizona
Author:
Etchberger, Richard Carl, 1957-
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Mountain sheep (Ovis canadensis mexicana) in the Pusch Ridge Wilderness (PRW), Santa Catalina Mountains, Arizona have abandoned historic habitat and now occupy 44 km². I used univariate analyses to quantify differences of physiographic and vegetational variables between abandoned habitat and habitat that is still used by mountain sheep. A discriminant function model characterized the magnitude of the differences between the 2 habitats. Habitat that supports mountain sheep has less human disturbance and is more open with more side oats grama (Bouteloua curtipendula), red brome (Bromus rubens), brittle bush (Encelia farinosa), and forb cover, but less ground cover, bush muhly (Muhlenbergia porteri), and turpentine bush (Haplopappus laricifolius) than habitat that was abandoned by mountain sheep. Fire is important in still used habitat because it reduces tall plants that obstruct mountain sheep vision. Human disturbances should be minimized in mountain sheep habitat.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Mountain sheep -- Habitat.; Sheep -- Arizona -- Santa Catalina Mountains.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Renewable Natural Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Krausman, Paul R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleMountain sheep habitat characteristics in the Pusch Ridge Wilderness, Arizonaen_US
dc.creatorEtchberger, Richard Carl, 1957-en_US
dc.contributor.authorEtchberger, Richard Carl, 1957-en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractMountain sheep (Ovis canadensis mexicana) in the Pusch Ridge Wilderness (PRW), Santa Catalina Mountains, Arizona have abandoned historic habitat and now occupy 44 km². I used univariate analyses to quantify differences of physiographic and vegetational variables between abandoned habitat and habitat that is still used by mountain sheep. A discriminant function model characterized the magnitude of the differences between the 2 habitats. Habitat that supports mountain sheep has less human disturbance and is more open with more side oats grama (Bouteloua curtipendula), red brome (Bromus rubens), brittle bush (Encelia farinosa), and forb cover, but less ground cover, bush muhly (Muhlenbergia porteri), and turpentine bush (Haplopappus laricifolius) than habitat that was abandoned by mountain sheep. Fire is important in still used habitat because it reduces tall plants that obstruct mountain sheep vision. Human disturbances should be minimized in mountain sheep habitat.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectMountain sheep -- Habitat.en_US
dc.subjectSheep -- Arizona -- Santa Catalina Mountains.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKrausman, Paul R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1335402en_US
dc.identifier.oclc21768367en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17309128en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17309116en_US
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