Communication strategies to restore or preserve informational and psychological privacy; the effects of privacy invasive questions in the health care context

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276798
Title:
Communication strategies to restore or preserve informational and psychological privacy; the effects of privacy invasive questions in the health care context
Author:
Le Poire, Beth Ann, 1964-
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This investigation explored the role of informational and psychological privacy in the health context by examining the relationship between type of relationship (physician versus acquaintance), type of observation (self-report versus observation), and communication strategies used to restore or preserve privacy (interaction control, dyadic strategies, expressions of negative arousal, blocking and avoidance, distancing, and confrontation). It was hypothesized and confirmed that individuals report exhibiting more behaviors to restore or preserve informational privacy in response to an informationally privacy-invasive question posed by an acquaintance than by a physician. The hypothesis that presentation of an informationally privacy invasive question by the physician causes patients to exhibit more communication strategies after the privacy invasive question than before, was unsupported. Finally, the hypothesis that individuals actually exhibit more privacy restoration behaviors than they report using in a similar situation with their physician was also unsupported. Patients reported using more communication strategies than they actually exhibited. One confound to the self reports was that videotaped participants reported the use of fewer direct privacy restoring communication strategies than non-videotaped.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Privacy, Right of.; Confidential communications -- Physicians.; Patient compliance.; Physician and patient.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Communication
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Bailey, William; Burgoon, Judee K.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleCommunication strategies to restore or preserve informational and psychological privacy; the effects of privacy invasive questions in the health care contexten_US
dc.creatorLe Poire, Beth Ann, 1964-en_US
dc.contributor.authorLe Poire, Beth Ann, 1964-en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis investigation explored the role of informational and psychological privacy in the health context by examining the relationship between type of relationship (physician versus acquaintance), type of observation (self-report versus observation), and communication strategies used to restore or preserve privacy (interaction control, dyadic strategies, expressions of negative arousal, blocking and avoidance, distancing, and confrontation). It was hypothesized and confirmed that individuals report exhibiting more behaviors to restore or preserve informational privacy in response to an informationally privacy-invasive question posed by an acquaintance than by a physician. The hypothesis that presentation of an informationally privacy invasive question by the physician causes patients to exhibit more communication strategies after the privacy invasive question than before, was unsupported. Finally, the hypothesis that individuals actually exhibit more privacy restoration behaviors than they report using in a similar situation with their physician was also unsupported. Patients reported using more communication strategies than they actually exhibited. One confound to the self reports was that videotaped participants reported the use of fewer direct privacy restoring communication strategies than non-videotaped.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPrivacy, Right of.en_US
dc.subjectConfidential communications -- Physicians.en_US
dc.subjectPatient compliance.en_US
dc.subjectPhysician and patient.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBailey, Williamen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBurgoon, Judee K.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1334356en_US
dc.identifier.oclc19293545en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b23347971en_US
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