Evaluation of a two-dimensional electromagnetic model for hyperthermia treatment planning

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276780
Title:
Evaluation of a two-dimensional electromagnetic model for hyperthermia treatment planning
Author:
Ross, Michael Paul, 1963-
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A series of hyperthermic, static, torso phantom experiments have been performed. The results are presented in comparison to a two-dimensional, theoretical, electromagnetic model. The 2-D model is assessed for potential use in clinical plannings and evaluations. Included in the assay of this model are comparisons of actual clinical patient data. Theoretically calculated electromagnetic fields and temperatures are obtained using a finite element numerical method (FEM) based on weighted residuals. Two experimental methods of extracting energy deposition data are discussed and utilized: (1) by measuring temperature differentials to calculate specific absorption rates (SAR), and (2) by measuring the square of the E-field directly which relates proportionally to the absorbed power. The employed regional heat source is an annular phased array (APA) operating at 70 MHz. The outcome of the assessment suggests that the results can be quantitative for simple heterogeneous phantom problems, but remain qualitative for clinical evaluative purposes.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Human body -- Mathematical models.; Thermotherapy.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Electrical and Computer Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Paulsen, Keith D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleEvaluation of a two-dimensional electromagnetic model for hyperthermia treatment planningen_US
dc.creatorRoss, Michael Paul, 1963-en_US
dc.contributor.authorRoss, Michael Paul, 1963-en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA series of hyperthermic, static, torso phantom experiments have been performed. The results are presented in comparison to a two-dimensional, theoretical, electromagnetic model. The 2-D model is assessed for potential use in clinical plannings and evaluations. Included in the assay of this model are comparisons of actual clinical patient data. Theoretically calculated electromagnetic fields and temperatures are obtained using a finite element numerical method (FEM) based on weighted residuals. Two experimental methods of extracting energy deposition data are discussed and utilized: (1) by measuring temperature differentials to calculate specific absorption rates (SAR), and (2) by measuring the square of the E-field directly which relates proportionally to the absorbed power. The employed regional heat source is an annular phased array (APA) operating at 70 MHz. The outcome of the assessment suggests that the results can be quantitative for simple heterogeneous phantom problems, but remain qualitative for clinical evaluative purposes.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHuman body -- Mathematical models.en_US
dc.subjectThermotherapy.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineElectrical and Computer Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPaulsen, Keith D.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1334310en_US
dc.identifier.oclc21894062en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17321207en_US
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