The significance of support systems to the divorce recovery process

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276755
Title:
The significance of support systems to the divorce recovery process
Author:
Stockman, Georgia Diane, 1936-
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Divorce in the United States is so widespread that it touches the lives of every citizen in some way. Divorcing adults face a multiplicity of problems including emotional, physical, and economic factors. The literature overwhelmingly suggests evidence of stress associated with this transition process. This study surveyed the feelings and opinions of 84 recently separated or divorced adults, 23 men and 61 women, in Pima County, Arizona, through a questionnaire designed to identify current life stressors, sources of support, and the quality of that support. The two stressors that were identified most often for both men and women were loneliness and anger. The source of support listed most often for both sexes was friends. There was strong evidence to support the hypothesis that it is a universal response for people faced with stress and trauma to turn to others for help and nurturance. It would appear that support networks do help to ameliorate some of the stress and pain, and that individuals have a multisource network.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Divorce -- Psychological aspects.; Social networks.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Family and Consumer Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Christensen, Oscar

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe significance of support systems to the divorce recovery processen_US
dc.creatorStockman, Georgia Diane, 1936-en_US
dc.contributor.authorStockman, Georgia Diane, 1936-en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractDivorce in the United States is so widespread that it touches the lives of every citizen in some way. Divorcing adults face a multiplicity of problems including emotional, physical, and economic factors. The literature overwhelmingly suggests evidence of stress associated with this transition process. This study surveyed the feelings and opinions of 84 recently separated or divorced adults, 23 men and 61 women, in Pima County, Arizona, through a questionnaire designed to identify current life stressors, sources of support, and the quality of that support. The two stressors that were identified most often for both men and women were loneliness and anger. The source of support listed most often for both sexes was friends. There was strong evidence to support the hypothesis that it is a universal response for people faced with stress and trauma to turn to others for help and nurturance. It would appear that support networks do help to ameliorate some of the stress and pain, and that individuals have a multisource network.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDivorce -- Psychological aspects.en_US
dc.subjectSocial networks.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineFamily and Consumer Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorChristensen, Oscaren_US
dc.identifier.proquest1334089en_US
dc.identifier.oclc21310549en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17212595en_US
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