Family stress, social support, and health beliefs as determinants of maternal compliance behavior in relation to the dietary management of the obese infant

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276747
Title:
Family stress, social support, and health beliefs as determinants of maternal compliance behavior in relation to the dietary management of the obese infant
Author:
Graver, Ellen, 1953-
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Hypotheses explaining maternal compliance behavior in relation to maternal attitudes and motivations and family and social influences were explored retrospectively in families of 39 obese infants from six to twelve months of age. Maternal social support and infant characteristics were not strongly associated or predictive of maternal compliance behavior. Stressful life changes in the family were negatively associated with maternal compliance to the dietary regimen. Maternal perception of infant fatness was negatively associated with dietary compliance behavior and positively associated with study protocol compliance behavior. Demographic variables were positively associated with compliance to study protocol. Family stress, maternal health beliefs, and demographic variables outweighed social support in their power to predict compliance behaviors. Compliance to study requirements did not necessarily mean compliance to the dietary regimen. Clinical use of assessing family stress, maternal beliefs and demographic variables appears to provide additional understanding of compliance behaviors in mothers with infant feeding recommendations.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Obesity in children -- Psychological aspects.; Nutrition disorders in infants -- Psychological aspects.; Patient compliance.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nutrition and Food Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Harrison, Gail

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleFamily stress, social support, and health beliefs as determinants of maternal compliance behavior in relation to the dietary management of the obese infanten_US
dc.creatorGraver, Ellen, 1953-en_US
dc.contributor.authorGraver, Ellen, 1953-en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractHypotheses explaining maternal compliance behavior in relation to maternal attitudes and motivations and family and social influences were explored retrospectively in families of 39 obese infants from six to twelve months of age. Maternal social support and infant characteristics were not strongly associated or predictive of maternal compliance behavior. Stressful life changes in the family were negatively associated with maternal compliance to the dietary regimen. Maternal perception of infant fatness was negatively associated with dietary compliance behavior and positively associated with study protocol compliance behavior. Demographic variables were positively associated with compliance to study protocol. Family stress, maternal health beliefs, and demographic variables outweighed social support in their power to predict compliance behaviors. Compliance to study requirements did not necessarily mean compliance to the dietary regimen. Clinical use of assessing family stress, maternal beliefs and demographic variables appears to provide additional understanding of compliance behaviors in mothers with infant feeding recommendations.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectObesity in children -- Psychological aspects.en_US
dc.subjectNutrition disorders in infants -- Psychological aspects.en_US
dc.subjectPatient compliance.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNutrition and Food Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHarrison, Gailen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1334079en_US
dc.identifier.oclc21358636en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17228074en_US
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