Response of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis to cultivation in media of differing composition

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276742
Title:
Response of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis to cultivation in media of differing composition
Author:
Yeh, Shi-Lian, 1959-
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is a pathogenic bacterium which cause suppurative infection mainly in sheep, goats, horses, and other species. It plays a major role in the economy of sheep production worldwide. It produces a toxic phospholipase D which may be involved in pathogenesis. The relationship of physiologic differences between the two biovars of the organism to rates of growth and toxin production are not known. In this work, isolates of C.pseudotuberculosis were examined for relative ability to grow in brain heart infusion broth and a semidefined medium. The effects of carbohydrate source and the presence or absence of various ions were also examined. Results revealed no statistically significant differences between isolates or biovars in any characteristic studied, including growth rate, pH change during growth and PLD production. The semidefined medium provides a reasonable alternative to more complex media for further work in purification of PLD and study of its structure and function.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis.; Culture media (Biology)
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Microbiology and Immunology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Songer, Glenn J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleResponse of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis to cultivation in media of differing compositionen_US
dc.creatorYeh, Shi-Lian, 1959-en_US
dc.contributor.authorYeh, Shi-Lian, 1959-en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractCorynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is a pathogenic bacterium which cause suppurative infection mainly in sheep, goats, horses, and other species. It plays a major role in the economy of sheep production worldwide. It produces a toxic phospholipase D which may be involved in pathogenesis. The relationship of physiologic differences between the two biovars of the organism to rates of growth and toxin production are not known. In this work, isolates of C.pseudotuberculosis were examined for relative ability to grow in brain heart infusion broth and a semidefined medium. The effects of carbohydrate source and the presence or absence of various ions were also examined. Results revealed no statistically significant differences between isolates or biovars in any characteristic studied, including growth rate, pH change during growth and PLD production. The semidefined medium provides a reasonable alternative to more complex media for further work in purification of PLD and study of its structure and function.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectCorynebacterium pseudotuberculosis.en_US
dc.subjectCulture media (Biology)en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMicrobiology and Immunologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSonger, Glenn J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1334074en_US
dc.identifier.oclc21136297en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17169331en_US
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