Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276740
Title:
A simulation model of an Ethernet with network partitioning
Author:
Pitts, Robert A.
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
One of the local area network medium access control standards created by the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers in IEEE Project 802 is the carrier sense multiple access with collision detection (CSMA/CD) medium access control. Numerous studies have been reported in the literature on the performance of CSMA/CD. These studies show that CSMA/CD performs well under light network load but not well at heavy load. To improve the performance of CSMA/CD under heavy load, a new concept called network partitioning is presented. Network partitioning allows the network to be partitioned into segments when under heavy load. Partition stations then act as bridges between the segments. The impact of network partitioning on network performance was tested using a simulation model of an Ethernet local area network (an implementation of the CSMA/CD medium access control). The simulation results show that network partitioning can improve the performance of CSMA/CD under heavy load.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Ethernet (Local area network system) -- Computer simulation.; Local area networks (Computer networks) -- Computer simulation.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Electrical and Computer Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Martinez, Ralph

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleA simulation model of an Ethernet with network partitioningen_US
dc.creatorPitts, Robert A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPitts, Robert A.en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractOne of the local area network medium access control standards created by the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers in IEEE Project 802 is the carrier sense multiple access with collision detection (CSMA/CD) medium access control. Numerous studies have been reported in the literature on the performance of CSMA/CD. These studies show that CSMA/CD performs well under light network load but not well at heavy load. To improve the performance of CSMA/CD under heavy load, a new concept called network partitioning is presented. Network partitioning allows the network to be partitioned into segments when under heavy load. Partition stations then act as bridges between the segments. The impact of network partitioning on network performance was tested using a simulation model of an Ethernet local area network (an implementation of the CSMA/CD medium access control). The simulation results show that network partitioning can improve the performance of CSMA/CD under heavy load.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEthernet (Local area network system) -- Computer simulation.en_US
dc.subjectLocal area networks (Computer networks) -- Computer simulation.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineElectrical and Computer Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMartinez, Ralphen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1333613en_US
dc.identifier.oclc21128540en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17168454en_US
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