Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276725
Title:
Copper, manganese, and zinc in Puerco River sediments
Author:
Henshel, Judy, 1958-
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A study was conducted to test for the presence of heavy metals (Cu, Mn, and Zn) in surface sediments of the Puerco River channel in the aftermath of a toxic spill in 1979 near Church Rock, New Mexico. Analysis of samples from five sites downstream from the spill showed that these substances were not present in unusually large amounts, though an increasing gradient of metal concentration with distance downstream was revealed. Statistical analysis revealed the Cu, Mn, and Zn were associated with clay and silt, soil organic matter, organic carbon, and carbonates, all of which existed as extraneous, uncontrolled variables. Adjusted metal concentrations, obtained with covariate analyses, confirmed the increasing gradient downstream. Clay and silt also increased downstream. Some toxic substances may have leached into the riverbed; possible mechanisms for this process are also discussed and further study to substantiate or disprove this hypothesis is recommended.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Water quality -- Puerco River (N.M. and Ariz.); Soils -- Heavy metal content -- Puerco River Watershed (N.M. and Ariz.)
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Renewable Natural Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Klemmedson, James O.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleCopper, manganese, and zinc in Puerco River sedimentsen_US
dc.creatorHenshel, Judy, 1958-en_US
dc.contributor.authorHenshel, Judy, 1958-en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA study was conducted to test for the presence of heavy metals (Cu, Mn, and Zn) in surface sediments of the Puerco River channel in the aftermath of a toxic spill in 1979 near Church Rock, New Mexico. Analysis of samples from five sites downstream from the spill showed that these substances were not present in unusually large amounts, though an increasing gradient of metal concentration with distance downstream was revealed. Statistical analysis revealed the Cu, Mn, and Zn were associated with clay and silt, soil organic matter, organic carbon, and carbonates, all of which existed as extraneous, uncontrolled variables. Adjusted metal concentrations, obtained with covariate analyses, confirmed the increasing gradient downstream. Clay and silt also increased downstream. Some toxic substances may have leached into the riverbed; possible mechanisms for this process are also discussed and further study to substantiate or disprove this hypothesis is recommended.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectWater quality -- Puerco River (N.M. and Ariz.)en_US
dc.subjectSoils -- Heavy metal content -- Puerco River Watershed (N.M. and Ariz.)en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKlemmedson, James O.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1333598en_US
dc.identifier.oclc20832136en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17102443en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17102431en_US
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