Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276699
Title:
A mechanism for the oxidation and fragmentation of a char particle
Author:
Scotto, Mark Vincent, 1960-
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A mechanism for the oxidation and fragmentation of a char particle was developed. Qualitative agreement between the model simulations and experimental data observed in the literature, is found for the higher gas temperatures (1700K). However fundamental differences are found in the particle temperature histories and burnout times at low temperature (1250K). The role that fragmentation plays on the char particle history is incorporated into the model and the possible production of fine particulate through fragmentation is examined. A relatively large fraction of the mass of char available for fragmentation is produced early in the combustion history of the particle. Therefore, if this mechanism is important in the generation of fine particulate matter during char combustion, the simulations indicate that it would occur early in the combustion process. Due to the limited experimental data in the literature on the time resolved particle size distribution in the early stages of combustion, corroboration between model and experiment was not possible.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Char -- Combustion.; Coal, Pulverized -- Combustion.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Chemical Engieering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Peterson, Thomas W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleA mechanism for the oxidation and fragmentation of a char particleen_US
dc.creatorScotto, Mark Vincent, 1960-en_US
dc.contributor.authorScotto, Mark Vincent, 1960-en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA mechanism for the oxidation and fragmentation of a char particle was developed. Qualitative agreement between the model simulations and experimental data observed in the literature, is found for the higher gas temperatures (1700K). However fundamental differences are found in the particle temperature histories and burnout times at low temperature (1250K). The role that fragmentation plays on the char particle history is incorporated into the model and the possible production of fine particulate through fragmentation is examined. A relatively large fraction of the mass of char available for fragmentation is produced early in the combustion history of the particle. Therefore, if this mechanism is important in the generation of fine particulate matter during char combustion, the simulations indicate that it would occur early in the combustion process. Due to the limited experimental data in the literature on the time resolved particle size distribution in the early stages of combustion, corroboration between model and experiment was not possible.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectChar -- Combustion.en_US
dc.subjectCoal, Pulverized -- Combustion.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemical Engieeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPeterson, Thomas W.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1333423en_US
dc.identifier.oclc20980780en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17130554en_US
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