Synchronized high frequency jet ventilation during extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276694
Title:
Synchronized high frequency jet ventilation during extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy
Author:
Warlick, Kathleen Marie, 1956-
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Physiologic and Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy (ESWL) data were collected before, during and after ESWL from four patient groups employing different anesthetic techniques (epidural anesthesia, general anesthesia with low-volume conventional mechanical ventilation or with unsynchronized high frequency jet ventilation (HFJV) or with HFJV synchronized to the heart rate). The primary goal was to determine if synchronized HFJV had any beneficial effects. A synchronization unit was fabricated that triggered one HFJV breath, per heart beat, delivered 30 milliseconds after the shock wave. This allowed only expiratory motion during shock wave administration. Results were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance, Students t-tests and chi-square tests with significance at p 0.05. Results showed that renal stone excursion was significantly less in HFJV groups and that significantly more patients required re-treatment in non-HFJV groups. No results indicated that synchronizing HFJV had any further benefits than unsynchronized HFJV.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Breathing apparatus.; Ultrasonic lithotripsy.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Electrical and Computer Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Mylrea, Kenneth C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleSynchronized high frequency jet ventilation during extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsyen_US
dc.creatorWarlick, Kathleen Marie, 1956-en_US
dc.contributor.authorWarlick, Kathleen Marie, 1956-en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPhysiologic and Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy (ESWL) data were collected before, during and after ESWL from four patient groups employing different anesthetic techniques (epidural anesthesia, general anesthesia with low-volume conventional mechanical ventilation or with unsynchronized high frequency jet ventilation (HFJV) or with HFJV synchronized to the heart rate). The primary goal was to determine if synchronized HFJV had any beneficial effects. A synchronization unit was fabricated that triggered one HFJV breath, per heart beat, delivered 30 milliseconds after the shock wave. This allowed only expiratory motion during shock wave administration. Results were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance, Students t-tests and chi-square tests with significance at p 0.05. Results showed that renal stone excursion was significantly less in HFJV groups and that significantly more patients required re-treatment in non-HFJV groups. No results indicated that synchronizing HFJV had any further benefits than unsynchronized HFJV.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBreathing apparatus.en_US
dc.subjectUltrasonic lithotripsy.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineElectrical and Computer Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMylrea, Kenneth C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1333272en_US
dc.identifier.oclc20444339en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17007100en_US
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