Shading coefficients of six tree species in Tucson and their impact on annual energy loads

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276661
Title:
Shading coefficients of six tree species in Tucson and their impact on annual energy loads
Author:
Dougherty, Eileen, 1958-
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study determined winter and summer shading coefficients for six commonly used landscape trees in Tucson using a photographic dot-matrix method. Tree types were developed from this data reflecting canopy density, shape, and foliage periods, then applied to SPS and MICROPAS computer programs to model effects of tree shade on annual energy loads for three residential construction types. Statistical analysis showed pruning to have a significant effect for 5 of the 6 species tested. Significant differences were also found among species and within species due to seasonal effects in foliage density. Shading scenarios manipulated the number and location of tree types were modeled. Greatest net annual savings were from 3 African sumac trees located on the west side of a masonry house typical of the 1950s (121). Shade from tree species found to have significantly different shading coefficients (10%) did not substantially increase energy savings ($5-12).
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Shade trees -- Arizona -- Tucson.; Landscape architecture and energy conservation.
Degree Name:
M.L.Arch.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Renewable Natural Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
McPherson, Gregory

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleShading coefficients of six tree species in Tucson and their impact on annual energy loadsen_US
dc.creatorDougherty, Eileen, 1958-en_US
dc.contributor.authorDougherty, Eileen, 1958-en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study determined winter and summer shading coefficients for six commonly used landscape trees in Tucson using a photographic dot-matrix method. Tree types were developed from this data reflecting canopy density, shape, and foliage periods, then applied to SPS and MICROPAS computer programs to model effects of tree shade on annual energy loads for three residential construction types. Statistical analysis showed pruning to have a significant effect for 5 of the 6 species tested. Significant differences were also found among species and within species due to seasonal effects in foliage density. Shading scenarios manipulated the number and location of tree types were modeled. Greatest net annual savings were from 3 African sumac trees located on the west side of a masonry house typical of the 1950s (121). Shade from tree species found to have significantly different shading coefficients (10%) did not substantially increase energy savings ($5-12).en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectShade trees -- Arizona -- Tucson.en_US
dc.subjectLandscape architecture and energy conservation.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.L.Arch.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMcPherson, Gregoryen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1333233en_US
dc.identifier.oclc20804394en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17091779en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17091767en_US
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