A laboratory assessment of flow characteristics and permeability of fractures in rock

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276629
Title:
A laboratory assessment of flow characteristics and permeability of fractures in rock
Author:
Ryan, Thomas Michael, 1963-
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Intact and fractured rock samples were studied in the laboratory in order to understand more fully the mechanism of closure of fractures subjected to high confining stresses and the resultant effect on specimen permeability. Confining stresses applied to the specimens ranged from 3.0 to 20.0 MPa, and the closure of fractures was observed by monitoring the change in the hydraulic conductivity of the specimens. Test results suggest that some resealing may occur due to crushing and realignment of mineral grains along a fracture surface. The closure of fractures is dependent upon the strength of the rock mass, the physical nature of the fracture, and the fluid pressure present in the fracture. Fracture closure is highly time dependent, and a number of nonlinear pressure flow relationships have been identified. These deviations are thought to represent two fundamentally different processes, the most important of which are turbulence in the flow and fracture expansion.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Rocks -- Cleavage.; Groundwater flow.; Fracture mechanics.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Mining and Geological Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Farmer, Ian

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleA laboratory assessment of flow characteristics and permeability of fractures in rocken_US
dc.creatorRyan, Thomas Michael, 1963-en_US
dc.contributor.authorRyan, Thomas Michael, 1963-en_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIntact and fractured rock samples were studied in the laboratory in order to understand more fully the mechanism of closure of fractures subjected to high confining stresses and the resultant effect on specimen permeability. Confining stresses applied to the specimens ranged from 3.0 to 20.0 MPa, and the closure of fractures was observed by monitoring the change in the hydraulic conductivity of the specimens. Test results suggest that some resealing may occur due to crushing and realignment of mineral grains along a fracture surface. The closure of fractures is dependent upon the strength of the rock mass, the physical nature of the fracture, and the fluid pressure present in the fracture. Fracture closure is highly time dependent, and a number of nonlinear pressure flow relationships have been identified. These deviations are thought to represent two fundamentally different processes, the most important of which are turbulence in the flow and fracture expansion.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectRocks -- Cleavage.en_US
dc.subjectGroundwater flow.en_US
dc.subjectFracture mechanics.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMining and Geological Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFarmer, Ianen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1332541en_US
dc.identifier.oclc19844195en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b16864219en_US
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