Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276596
Title:
Reproductive success of round-tailed ground squirrels
Author:
Hardy, Danita Sue, 1957-
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
I studied round-tailed ground squirrels (Spermophilus tereticaudus) to determine if presence of water or green vegetation significantly increased reproductive success. I compared the number of juveniles produced, body weights, and diets of squirrels during 1981-84 on 2 plots with green vegetation and no free water, on 3 plots with free water and no green vegetation, and 2 control plots. Reproductive success and body weights of adult and juvenile squirrels were significantly higher (P ≥ 0.001) on plots with green vegetation than on either watered or control plots. Body weights of squirrels on plots with water only and control plots were not significantly different (P ≥ 0.05). Adult squirrels without access to green vegetation during winter and spring failed to reproduce even though free water was readily available. Percent of diet overlap, diversity, and evenness of squirrel diets on control and watered plots were not significantly different. Green vegetation appeared to be the limiting factor for round-tailed ground squirrels.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Round-tailed ground squirrel -- Arizona.; Ground squirrels -- Reproduction.; Ground squirrels -- Feeding and feeds.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Renewable Natural Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Smith, Norman S.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleReproductive success of round-tailed ground squirrelsen_US
dc.creatorHardy, Danita Sue, 1957-en_US
dc.contributor.authorHardy, Danita Sue, 1957-en_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractI studied round-tailed ground squirrels (Spermophilus tereticaudus) to determine if presence of water or green vegetation significantly increased reproductive success. I compared the number of juveniles produced, body weights, and diets of squirrels during 1981-84 on 2 plots with green vegetation and no free water, on 3 plots with free water and no green vegetation, and 2 control plots. Reproductive success and body weights of adult and juvenile squirrels were significantly higher (P ≥ 0.001) on plots with green vegetation than on either watered or control plots. Body weights of squirrels on plots with water only and control plots were not significantly different (P ≥ 0.05). Adult squirrels without access to green vegetation during winter and spring failed to reproduce even though free water was readily available. Percent of diet overlap, diversity, and evenness of squirrel diets on control and watered plots were not significantly different. Green vegetation appeared to be the limiting factor for round-tailed ground squirrels.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectRound-tailed ground squirrel -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectGround squirrels -- Reproduction.en_US
dc.subjectGround squirrels -- Feeding and feeds.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSmith, Norman S.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1332460en_US
dc.identifier.oclc18955808en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b16678813en_US
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