Effects of interlocutor directiveness and lexical familiarity on an autistic child's immediate echolalia

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276578
Title:
Effects of interlocutor directiveness and lexical familiarity on an autistic child's immediate echolalia
Author:
Violette, Joseph Daniel, 1957-
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study of one echolalic boy with autism assessed the effects of interlocutor directiveness (high and low) and knowledge of the lexical items (known and unknown) on the frequency of occurrence of immediate verbal imitations (IVIs). The occurrence of IVIs produced in response to the condition in which unknown items were presented with a high directive style differed significantly (p < .05) from the occurrence of IVIs produced in response to the other conditions. This finding suggests that previous studies attributing increases in IVIs solely to either linguistic or social variables did not account for interaction effects. A visual display of the data indicated that the first presentation of a lexical item accounted for most of the increases in IVIs relative to subsequent presentations of the same item. This observation is in line with the interpretation of Leonard, Schwartz, Folger, Newhoff, & Wilcox, (1979), that normal children imitate the most "informative" items.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Autistic children.; Imitation in children.; Language acquisition.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Speech and Hearing Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Swisher, Linda

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleEffects of interlocutor directiveness and lexical familiarity on an autistic child's immediate echolaliaen_US
dc.creatorViolette, Joseph Daniel, 1957-en_US
dc.contributor.authorViolette, Joseph Daniel, 1957-en_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study of one echolalic boy with autism assessed the effects of interlocutor directiveness (high and low) and knowledge of the lexical items (known and unknown) on the frequency of occurrence of immediate verbal imitations (IVIs). The occurrence of IVIs produced in response to the condition in which unknown items were presented with a high directive style differed significantly (p < .05) from the occurrence of IVIs produced in response to the other conditions. This finding suggests that previous studies attributing increases in IVIs solely to either linguistic or social variables did not account for interaction effects. A visual display of the data indicated that the first presentation of a lexical item accounted for most of the increases in IVIs relative to subsequent presentations of the same item. This observation is in line with the interpretation of Leonard, Schwartz, Folger, Newhoff, & Wilcox, (1979), that normal children imitate the most "informative" items.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAutistic children.en_US
dc.subjectImitation in children.en_US
dc.subjectLanguage acquisition.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpeech and Hearing Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSwisher, Lindaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1332428en_US
dc.identifier.oclc19296150en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b16748049en_US
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